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Expert Reviews

Thankfully, this fragrance-free liquid foundation with an in-part titanium dioxide sunscreen has several "wow" factors that have nothing to do with oxygen. Using products that increase the skin's oxygen level (which the claims for this imply) is a bad thing, because oxygen causes free-radical damage, inside and outside our bodies—and cumulative free-radical damage is a leading causative factor of aging. The whole concept of using antioxidants is all about reducing the oxidative damage caused by oxygen and other types of free radicals.

Oxygen claim aside, this foundation has a slightly moist but silky texture that feels light and is easy to blend. You'll get light coverage and a soft, natural-looking matte finish that's best for normal to oily or combination skin.

The shade range offers workable options for very light to dark skin tones. Both "Cheers to Me" Champagne and "I’m So Money" Honey are slightly peach but still worth testing. All told, save for those shade missteps, Benefit has produced an excellent foundation with reliable broad-spectrum sunscreen.

Note: This product was recently downgraded from 5-stars to 4-stars due to its less-than-optimal SPF rating. Although this does provide sun protection, it's less than SPF 30. The problem? Health experts and medical boards around the globe agree that SPF 30 or greater is best when it comes to providing a reliable defense against the damage the sun can do. Yes, a foundation with less than SPF 30 is acceptable if your daytime moisturizer is rated SPF 30 or greater, but we wouldn't want anyone thinking an SPF under 30 is the best for skin. See More Info below for details.

Pros:
  • Provides broad-spectrum sun protection.
  • Lightweight yet hydrating texture is fragrance-free.
  • Sets to a natural-looking soft matte finish.
  • Some great neutral shades.
Cons:
  • SPF 25 is below worldwide standards for optimum sun protection.
More Info:

Sunscreens Rated Lower than an SPF 30: An extensive body of research and a growing number of medical organizations around the world have determined that a sunscreen rated SPF 30 or greater is mandatory to ensure adequate sun protection.

Although a sunscreen rated lower than 30 will provide protection at the SPF number on the label and may claim broad-spectrum protection, we always point out when it does not have a rating of SPF 30 or greater because that's so important for the health and appearance of your skin.

References for this information:

Journal of Clinical Oncology, September 2016, ePublication

Photodermatology, Photoimmunology, and Photomedicine, August 2014, pages 212–219

The Journal of Clinical and Aesthetic Dermatology, September 2012, pages 18–23

Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology, May 2008, Supplemental, pages S149–S154

https://www.aad.org/forms/policies/uploads/ps/ps-broad-spectrum%20protection%20of%20sunscreen%20products.pdf

http://www.aacr.org/Newsroom/Pages/News-Release-Detail.aspx?ItemID=857#.V9HN45grLcs

Last Updated:04.24.2017
Jar Packaging:No
Tested on animals:Yes
Community Reviews
Claims
Ingredients

Active Ingredients: Octinoxate 5.49%; Titanium Dioxide 2.37%; Other Ingredients: Water, Dimethicone, Glycerin, Phenyl Trimethicone, Isododecane, PEG-9 Polydimethylsiloxyethyl Dimethicone, Butylene Glycol, Butylene Glycol Dicaprylate / Dicaprate, Pentylene Glycol, Maris Aqua (Sea Water), Phenoxyethanol, Chondrus Crispus (Carrageenan), Silica, Disteardimonium Hectorite, Stearic Acid, Sodium Myristoyl Glutamate, Alumina, Tocopheryl Acetate, Propylene Carbonate, Prolinamidoethyl Imidazole, Saccharomyces Lysate Extract, Ascorbyl Tetraisopalmitate, BHT. May Contain: Aluminum Hydroxide, Ultramarines, Bismuth Oxychloride, Iron Oxides, Titanium Dioxide

Brand Overview

Benefit At-A-Glance

Benefit was developed by twins Jean Danielson and Jane Blackford, whose initial claim to fame was a stint as the Calgon twins back in 1960s television commercials. They opened their first cosmetics store, The Face Place, in San Francisco, circa 1976, and then, perhaps recognizing the need for a name with more impact, The Face Place became Benefit in 1990. From there the line took off and expanded its presence beyond the Bay Area to include national department stores and, eventually, Sephora boutiques.

Benefit's makeup philosophy is outrageously fun and its product arsenal is centered on impossibly cute names and a lexicon that aims to make beauty enjoyable. Benefit single-handedly started the trend of selling makeup and skincare products with ultra-cute appellations for less than ultra-fancy prices. As with most lines, there are enough missteps and problem products to shop carefully, but Benefit shines in several categories, including foundation, bronzing powder, blush, and shimmer products.

Unfortunately, some of the products simply can't live up to their promises. This is mostly true of their skincare formulas, where the showcased ingredients are either present in itsy-bitsy amounts or the claims attributed to them are very exaggerated. Despite this, if you're in the mood for a fun experience and can manage to choose products wisely while enjoying the whimsy, Benefit deserves a look.

For more information about Benefit, visit www.Benefitcosmetics.com.

About the Experts

The Beautypedia and Paula’s Choice Research teams have one mission: To help you find the best products for your skin, whether they’re from Paula’s Choice or another brand. By combining efforts, we’re able to share scientific research and remain committed to the highest standards based on our decades of experience objectively reviewing thousands upon thousands of skincare and makeup formularies in all price ranges.


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