10

Yes To

Yes to Tomatoes Clear Skin Detoxifying Charcoal Mud Mask

2.00 fl. oz. for $ 15.99
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Brand Overview

Clear Skin Detoxifying Charcoal Mud Mask is a mix of pros and cons. It offers absorbent properties ideal for those with oily skin and delivers a roundup of beneficial antioxidants at the same time. The downside is that it fails to deliver on its promise to "treat and prevent acne breakouts with salicylic acid" and it contains potentially skin-aggravating fragrance. Sigh.

Housed in a standard squeeze tube, the cream textured mask has the characteristically deep gray tint that charcoal masks are known for. You're instructed to apply a generous layer and leave it on skin for 10 minutes.

Warning: This mask has a noticeable aroma—a red flag indicator that it's potentially causing trouble below skin's surface (see More Info to understand why). If you have any amount of temperamental, dry skin, you should probably bypass this mask altogether.

When rinsed off, you'll find that Clear Skin Detoxifying Charcoal Mud Mask has absorbed excess oil from skin, leaving it matte but not tightly dried out. (Of course, this assumes you don't have dry skin to begin—this formula should only be used on oily skin or oily areas like the T-zone.)

The 0.5% salicylic acid would have been a nice addition to give skin a slight boost of exfoliation and help with breakouts, but since you're only leaving this mask on for 10 minutes and the pH is too high for optimal exfoliation, don't count on it having much benefit, if any, for blemish prone skin.

On balance, the mix of clays and other absorbent ingredients can help gently dislodge debris from congested pores. Does this mean it's "detoxifying" skin? NO. Skin can't be detoxified the way this product claims and, more to the point, toxins aren't the reason your pores are clogged or why your skin is oily in the first place. We explain this further in the More Info section.

To sum it up, this absorbent mask offers some benefits, though not quite as claimed and when you factor in the fragrance, it's questionable for skin. We suggest checking out our top-rated masks for oily skin to achieve better results!

Pros:
  • Offers a mix of absorbent ingredients that leave oily skin matte but not dried out.
  • Can help dislodge debris from congested pores.
  • Contains some beneficial antioxidants.
Cons:
  • Contains potentially skin-aggravating fragrance (bad news for all skin types, especially sensitive).
  • The 0.5% salicylic acid isn't formulated properly to truly have benefit.
More Info:

Why Fragrance Spells Trouble for Skin: Daily use of products that contain a high amount of fragrance, whether the fragrant ingredients are synthetic or natural, causes a chronic sensitizing reaction on skin.

This leads to all kinds of problems, including disruption of skin's healthy appearance, worsening dryness, redness, depletion of vital substances in skin's surface, and generally keeps skin from looking healthy, smooth, and hydrated. Fragrance free is always the best way to go.

A surprising fact: Even though you can't always see the negative influence of using products that contain fragrance has on skin, the damage will still be taking place even if it's not evident on the surface. Research has demonstrated that you don't always need to see or feel the effects on your skin for your skin to be suffering. This negative impact and the visible damage may not become apparent for a long time.

References for this information:

Biochimica and Biophysica Acta, May 2012, pages 1,410-1,419

Aging, March 2012, pages 166-175

Chemical Immunology and Allergy, March 2012, pages 77-80

Experimental Dermatology, October 2009, pages 821-832

Food and Chemical Toxicology, February 2008, pages 446—475

International Journal of Toxicology, 2008, Supplement pages 1-43

Skin Pharmacology and Physiology, 2008, pages 191-202

American Journal of Clinical Dermatology, 2003, pages 789-798

Why Beauty Products Can't Detoxify Your Skin: Despite the claims of many cosmetics company's make, you cannot "detox" your skin because your skin does not store toxins.

Toxins are classified as being produced by the body or introduced into the body, usually through eating or inhaling. They can be produced by plants, animals, insects, reptiles (think snake venom or bee stings), etc. They also can be inorganic, such as heavy metals like lead, arsenic, and others.

When it comes to your skin, toxins cannot leave your body vis-a-vis your skin or sebaceous gland. It is physiologically impossible. Other parts of your body, mainly your kidneys and liver, handle the process of "detoxifying" just fine as long as you have a healthy diet.

It should be pointed out that there are a handful of studies showing sweat can be a carrier of "detoxifying" certain trace heavy metals out of the body. However, the methodology of those studies is considered questionable. Nonetheless, if you choose to sauna, steam, or exercise to increase sweating that is a lifestyle option to discuss with your physician, but that has absolutely nothing to do with skincare.

Skincare products are not going to detox your body or skin. As we always urge, stick to what the research says really works, and ignore the fantasy claims because they aren't helping your skin or your budget.

References for this information:

Journal of Human Nutrition and Dietetics, December 2015, issue 6, pages 675-686

Journal of Environmental and Public Health, 2012, volume 2012, pages 1-10

http://www.health.harvard.edu/staying-healthy/the-dubious-practice-of-detox

Jar Packaging: No
Tested on animals: No
This natural mud mask draws out impurities with charcoal, treats and prevents acne breakouts with salicylic acid, and conditions with a botanical blend of tomato, aloe, watermelon, pumpkin, and chamomile extracts. Even dreamier? Its so rich and creamy, youll feel as if you are at the spa.
Active: Salicylic Acid (0.5%). Other: Water, Propanediol, Bentonite, Kaolin, Glycerin, Magnesium Aluminum Silicate, Galactoarabinan, Aloe Barbadensis (Aloe) Leaf Juice, Charcoal Powder, Allantoin, Citrullus Lanatus (Watermelon) Fruit Extract, Lens Esculenta (Lentil) Seed Extract, Solanum Lycopersicum (Tomato) Fruit/Leaf/Stem Extract, Gingko Biloba Leaf Extract, Cucurbita Pepo (Pumpkin), Chamomilla Recutita (Matricaria) Flower Extract, Aspalathus Linearis Extract, Xanthan Gum, Iron Oxide (CI 77499), Alcohol, Sodium Hydroxide, Phenoxyethanol, Fragrance.

Yes To At-A-Glance

How this Israel-based brand of skin-care products came to be so widely distributed is an impressive marketing feat. Its sold in over a dozen countries and weve seen it locally in such diverse places as Safeway (a grocery store) and Ulta (a salon/spa/cosmetics boutique). Business is booming in the natural products market, and it appears that the Yes To brand is on its way to being one of the frontrunners! Yes To products were even featured on the popular daytime talk show The View. Clearly, this line has attracted the attention both of consumers and the media.

Why all the fuss? Well do our best to explain, but the simple reality is that the success of this brand is due to the fact that lots of consumers want natural products, regardless of whether or not the formula is beneficial for skin. Many women (but not those who read our reviews) are completely unaware that many of the products from the so-called natural product lines contain just as many synthetic ingredients as unnatural brands. Thats no longer the case with Yes To products, but not too long ago, it was!

The Yes To brand is divided into multiple sub-brands. To name a few: Yes To Carrots, Yes To Cucumbers, Yes To Tomatoes, Yes To Grapefruit, Yes to Coconut and Yes To Blueberries. The original launch and the largest group is Yes To Carrots. After the carrot-containing products became a hit, the company began to assemble a tossed salad of other products, including their Yes To Cucumbers, Yes To Tomatoes, and Yes to Blueberries. What next? Were anticipating Yes To Lettuce and Yes To Blue Cheese Dressing, that way you can make a complete salad!

All kidding aside, Yes To products are worth a look if you prefer mostly natural ingredients, though not every natural ingredient Yes To uses has been proven beneficial for skin, and some are problematic. As with most natural-themed lines, there are a handful of Yes To products to consider. But few of them are state-of-the-art and there are no products to successfully manage acne or blackheads, lighten skin discolorations, or significantly reduce redness

Although it is commendable that Yes To doesnt make over-the-top anti-aging claims, a skin-care line should help take care of skins daily needs, and this lines products are somewhat lacking. All the fruits, vegetables, and any natural ingredient you can name isnt enough to protect skin from the cumulative damage of unprotected sun exposure (the Yes To brand does sell a couple of excellent sunscreens) or to satisfy other skin-care needs. Its a nice idea to think that tomatoes, carrots, sweet potatoes, and blueberries are as good for your skin when applied topically as they are for your health when consumed as part of a healthy diet, but thats simply not the case. Still, if you shop this line carefully youll come away with some workable products that are pleasant to use.

For more information about Yes To and its food-themed brands, visit www.yestocarrots.com.

About the Experts

The Beautypedia team consists of skin care and makeup experts personally trained by the original Cosmetics Cop and best-selling beauty author, Paula Begoun. We’re fascinated by skin care and makeup products and thrilled when they meet or exceed our expectations, but we’re also disappointed when they fail to perform as claimed, are wildly overpriced, or contain ingredients scientific research has proven can hurt skin.

Our mission has always been to help you find the best products for your skin, no matter your budget or preferences. Beautypedia’s thorough and insightful reviews cut through the hype and provide reliable recommendations for all ages, skin types, and skin tones.

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