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Glow Recipe

Watermelon Glow Lip Pop

0.10 fl. oz. for $ 22.00
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Ingredients

Brand Overview

Glow Recipe’s Watermelon Glow Lip Pop promises to exfoliate, hydrate and tint lips all-in-one. We were all set to jump on board, but unfortunately, this Lip Pop fizzles out.

Packaged in a standard twist-up lipstick-style component, Watermelon Glow Lip Pop has a solid balm texture infused with coconut flower sugar particles intended to provide manual exfoliation.

The sugar particles aren’t scratchy and gently breakdown as you press lips together, which is good news… but they also don’t work all that well to slough off dead skin. Glow Recipe claims the formula’s “flower-derived AHAs” help boost that exfoliating effort, but you can ignore that (those ingredients are unable to provide exfoliation in this balm formula due to the low amounts and types used).

What about the hydration claims? Dry lips are treated to instant relief as you apply Watermelon Glow Lip Pop —but that feeling is fleeting. We found ourselves continually having to reapply because the hydration quickly dissipates. The other problem is that lip balm’s strong watermelon-candy scent is a red flag for irritation, which can actually make dry lips worse (see More Info).

As for the pink tint, it goes on very sheer, adding just a hint of color to enhance your natural lip tone. Otherwise, Watermelon Glow Lip Pop is a letdown. Peruse our top-rated lip care for superior options.

Pros:
  • Adds a sheer pink flush to lips.
Cons:
  • Contains potentially irritating fragrance, which can make dry lips worse.
  • Balm doesn’t offer long-lasting hydration compared to today’s best formulas.
  • Over-exaggerated exfoliation claims.

Why Fragrance Is a Problem for Skin: Daily use of products that contain a high amount of fragrance, whether the fragrant ingredients are synthetic or natural, causes a chronic sensitizing reaction on skin.

This reaction in turn leads to all kinds of problems, including disrupting skin’s barrier, worsening dryness, increasing or triggering redness, depleting vital substances in skin’s surface, and generally preventing skin from looking healthy, smooth, and hydrated. Fragrance free is always the best way to go for all skin types.

A surprising fact: Even though you can’t always see or feel the negative effects of fragrant ingredients on skin, the damage will still be taking place, even if it’s not evident on the surface. Research has demonstrated that you don’t need to see or feel the effects of irritation for your skin to be suffering. Much like the effects from cumulative sun damage, the negative impact and the visible damage from fragrance may not become apparent for a long time.

References for this information:
Toxicology In Vitro, February 2018, pages 237-245
Toxicological Sciences, January 2018, pages 139-148
Biochimica and Biophysica Acta, May 2012, pages 1410–1419
Aging, March 2012, pages 166–175
Chemical Immunology and Allergy, March 2012, pages 77–80
Experimental Dermatology, October 2009, pages 821–832
Skin Pharmacology and Physiology, 2008, pages 191–202
International Journal of Toxicology, Volume 27, 2008, Supplement, pages 1–43
Food and Chemical Toxicology, February 2008, pages 446–475
American Journal of Clinical Dermatology, 2003, pages 789–798

Jar Packaging: No
Tested on animals: No

A three-in-one scrub-to-balm that smooths, hydrates, and tints lips in a universal pop of pink.

Diisostearyl Malate, Pentaerythrityl Tetraisostearate, Hydrogenated Polyisobutene, Phytostearyl/Isostearyl/Cetyl/Stearyl/Behenyl Dimer Dilinoleate, Polyethylene, Diphenyl Dimethicone, Jojoba Esters, Tridecyl Trimellitate, Dipentaerythrityl Hexahydroxystearate/Hexastearate/Hexarosinate, Caprylyl Methicone, Trioctyldodecyl Citrate, Microcrystalline Wax/Cire Microcristalline, Silica Dimethyl Silyate, Octyldodecanol, Citrullus Lanatus (Watermelon) Seed Oil, Coconut Flower Sugar, Ceresin, Citrullus Lanatus (Watermelon) Fruit Extract, Glyceryl Behenate/Eicosadioate, Isostearic Acid, Hibiscus Sabdariffa Flower Extract, Maltodextrin, Dehydroacetic Acid, Citric Acid, Titanium Dioxide, Propylene Glycol, Aqua/Water/Eau, Tocopherol, Malic Acid, Ascorbic Acid, Tartaric Acid, Crataegus Monogyna Flower Extract, Sodium Benzoate, Potassium Sorbate, Viola Tricolor Extract, Red 27 (CI 45410:1), Red 7 Lake (CI15850:1), Red 6 (CI15850), Fragrance/Parfum.

Glow Recipe got its start as a website, created by co-founders Sarah Lee and Christine Chang. Lee and Chang leveraged a combined 20 years in the beauty business in both the U.S. and Korea (they worked for L’Oreal in both countries), to get Korean-based beauty brands to sell their products on an American-based platform. The goal: to create a one-stop-shopping destination for American consumers curious about the trends and products of the Korean beauty industry (K-Beauty).

In time, as the site’s popularity grew, Lee and Chang decided to branch out and create their own line of products under the Glow Recipe name. To that end, the brand focuses on a small but curated group of trend-driven skin care products, with bright, eye-catching packaging and fruity fragrances.

Though most Glow Recipe products are in clear packaging (which doesn’t protect delicate ingredients from light exposure), and some products come in jars that don’t protect them from light or air, the formulary concepts are all intriguing.

Each product contains a good complement of antioxidants, plus moisturizing and skin-soothing ingredients. A few even include alpha hydroxy and beta hydroxy acids, too. Though the products contain fragrance, it’s not overwhelming; however, because even small amounts of fragrance still have the potential to irritate skin, their ratings were held back.

To learn more about Glow Recipe, visit www.glowrecipe.com.

About the Experts

The Beautypedia team consists of skin care and makeup experts personally trained by the original Cosmetics Cop and best-selling beauty author, Paula Begoun. We’re fascinated by skin care and makeup products and thrilled when they meet or exceed our expectations, but we’re also disappointed when they fail to perform as claimed, are wildly overpriced, or contain ingredients scientific research has proven can hurt skin.

Our mission has always been to help you find the best products for your skin, no matter your budget or preferences. Beautypedia’s thorough and insightful reviews cut through the hype and provide reliable recommendations for all ages, skin types, and skin tones.

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