9

Tatcha

Violet-C Radiance Mask

1.70 fl. oz. for $ 68.00
Expert Rating

Expert Reviews

Community Reviews

Claims

Ingredients

Brand Overview

Violet-C Radiance Mask contains a stable form of vitamin C (ascorbyl tetraisopalmitate) but this product's jar packaging likely won't keep it that way, not to mention it affects the stability of the plant extracts this contains. We explain further in the More Info section, but the take-home message is that skincare in jar packaging should generally be avoided.

That said, Violet-C Radiance Mask is a decent option for normal to combination skin. It absorbs excess oil without drying out skin, and some of the plant extracts and ferments it contains are intriguing, although the claims are overstated.

What makes this mask problematic are the citrus juices it contains, referred to as an AHA complex of fruits. Acids in fruit juices can exfoliate skin, but not in the same documented, controlled manner as research-proven AHAs and BHA ingredients such as glycolic and salicylic acids. More important, they tend to be more irritating and don't bring additional benefits to skin, such as hydration and reducing inflammation.

In short, despite some interesting ingredients (and a lot of shine from the mineral pigment mica), this mask isn't worth strong consideration.

Pros:
  • Absorbs excess oil without drying skin.
  • Contains some novel yet intriguing ingredients.
Cons:
  • Jar packaging won't help keep the vitamins and plant extracts stable once opened.
  • Citrus juice extracts pose a strong risk of irritating skin.
  • AHA complex of fruits isn't the same as pure AHAs like glycolic acid.
More Info:

Jar Packaging & Anti-Aging Masks: Beneficial anti-aging ingredients, which include all plant extracts, almost all vitamins, antioxidants, and other state-of-the-art ingredients, are unstable, which means they begin to break down in the presence of air. Once a jar is opened and lets air in, these important ingredients begin to deteriorate, becoming less and less effective. Routine exposure to daylight also is problematic for these ingredients.

Jar packaging is also unsanitary because you dip your fingers into the jar with each use, contaminating the product. This stresses the preservative system, leading to further deterioration of the beneficial ingredients.

Remember: The ingredients that provide the most benefit in addressing visible signs of aging must be in airtight or air-restrictive packaging to remain effective throughout usage. Buying products in this type of packaging means that the ingredients have the best chance of remaining effective—to the benefit of your skin!

References for this information:

Pharmacology Review, July 2013, pages 97–106

Dermatologic Therapy, May-June 2012, pages 252–259

Current Drug Delivery, November 2011, pages 640–660

Journal of Agricultural Food Chemistry, May 2011, pages 4676–4683

Journal of Biophotonics, January 2010, pages 82–88

Guidelines of Stability Testing of Cosmetic Products, Colipa-CTFA, March 2004, pages 1–10

Jar Packaging: Yes
Tested on animals: No
Reveal remarkably softer, smoother skin with this creamy rinse-off treatment mask. The formula features two types of vitamin C: a water-soluble vitamin C derivative that absorbs quickly for an immediate glow and an oil-soluble vitamin C derivative that remains in skin longer, providing antioxidant protection from UV damage for a brighter, more even-toned appearance over time. The mask is also powered by the Japanese beautyberry, a superfruit rich in antioxidants that was found to stabilize vitamin C, maximizing its effectiveness. A gentle 10 percent AHA complex of seven fruits removes debris and the buildup of dead skin cells to visibly improve skin texture and support the natural production of new skin cells.
Kaolin, Water, Glycerin, Saccharomyces/Camellia Sinensis Leaf/Cladosiphon Okamuranus/Rice Ferment Filtrate, Propanediol, Oryza Sativa (Rice) Germ Oil, Cetearyl Alcohol, Butylene Glycol, Mica, Ascorbyl Tetraisopalmitate, Bis-Glyceryl Ascorbate, Pyrus Malus (Apple) Fruit Extract, Citrus Paradisi (Grapefruit) Fruit Extract, Citrus Aurantium Dulcis (Orange) Juice, Citrus Limon (Lemon) Juice, Citrus Aurantifolia (Lime) Juice, Callicarpa Japonica Fruit Extract, Ziziphus Jujuba Fruit Extract, Crataegus Cuneata Fruit Extract, Glyceryl Stearate, Cellulose Gum, Dimethicone, Sodium Stearoyl Glutamate, Polymethyl Methacrylate, Disodium EDTA, Ethylhexylglycerin, Fragrance, Phenoxyethanol. May Contain: Titanium Dioxide (Ci 77891), Tin Oxide (Ci 77861), Violet 2 (Ci 60725), Carmine (Ci 75470), Ferric Ferrocyanide (Ci 77510)].

Tatcha At-a-Glance

The allure of ancient beauty treatments coupled with modern science is tempting for many peopleand the Japan-inspired brand Tatcha plays that combination up to the max. As the story goes, Harvard graduate and businesswoman Victoria Tsai, had a chance encounter with a modern-day geisha on a trip to Kyoto, Japan. What followed was an introduction to a fabled book on the beauty secrets of the geisha, which led to Tsais desire to translate these secrets and tips into a modern-day skincare line.

The hallmark ingredients Tsai and her team seem most interested in are of Japan-inspired such as green tea, red algae, and rice bran which are supposedly mentioned often in the ancient geisha beauty book. Although all three of these ingredients have merit for skin, research hasnt shown them to purify or do some of the other things for skin that Tatcha claims. What you really need to know is none of these are the solution for any skin concern or for any skin type.

One more point, the entire premise of Tatcha is built around Japanese geishas beauty routines, but this assumes that under all of their decorative makeup, geishas have (or had) beautiful, flawless skin. In all likelihood, some do and some dont, but its quite likely that when unadorned and viewed close up, these women have the same types of skin issues as women the world oversave for perhaps fewer signs of sun damage, as most east Asian cultures are careful about avoiding sun exposure.

Enough about the marketing story because what really matters is the quality of the products and whether or not they are beneficial for skin. The short answer is this line has more problematic formulations than beneficial ones.

Chief among the concerns that keep us from getting behind this line are an abundance of fragrance (natural or not, fragrance can irritate skin) and several products housed in jars that expose their delicate ingredients to light and air.

Admittedly, its easy to get swept up in what the ancients knew and kept to themselves for centuries, only to have these seemingly amazing secrets finally divulged. We wish that were a wise way to find the best products for your skin, but despite Tatchas promises, your skin will be left wanting more.

For more information about Tatcha visit www.tatcha.com.

About the Experts

The Beautypedia team consists of skin care and makeup experts personally trained by the original Cosmetics Cop and best-selling beauty author, Paula Begoun. We’re fascinated by skin care and makeup products and thrilled when they meet or exceed our expectations, but we’re also disappointed when they fail to perform as claimed, are wildly overpriced, or contain ingredients scientific research has proven can hurt skin.

Our mission has always been to help you find the best products for your skin, no matter your budget or preferences. Beautypedia’s thorough and insightful reviews cut through the hype and provide reliable recommendations for all ages, skin types, and skin tones.