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philosophy

the microdelivery triple-acid brightening peel

12.00 for $ 70.00
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Ingredients

Brand Overview

This fragrance-free at-home peel includes 12 individual applications, each with a pre-soaked pad that's packaged in its own pouch. You're supposed to use one peel per week, so this should last up to three months. Although that makes the price seem reasonable, the formula's alcohol content is a problem—see More Info for details.

The exfoliating ingredients include a blend of glycolic, mandelic, and malic acids, although philosophy doesn't reveal the percentage, so you can't be sure how much you're getting (and concentration counts here). We suspect the lead acid, mandelic, is present between 2-5%, which isn't a lot—we'd prefer to see glycolic acid as the star exfoliant because it has so much research supporting its use. Still, the pH is within range for exfoliation to occur and while that's great, the fact is there are gentler products to refine skin's texture and improve uneven tone.

Fragrance ingredients are also included, which only increases the irritation potential of this leave-on peel.

All told, this ends up being a waste of time and money, and, of course, there's "zero downtime" because this doesn't work even remotely like a doctor-administered facial peel.

Pros:
  • Fragrance-free.
Cons:
  • Expensive (and a waste of time) considering the lack of efficacy.
  • Amount of mandelic acid is too low to offer much exfoliating benefit, and the pH is not within range for it to work in this manner.
  • Contains enough alcohol to put skin at risk of irritation.
More Info:

Alcohol-Based Skincare Products:

Research makes it clear that alcohol, as a main ingredient in any skincare product, especially one you use frequently and repeatedly, is a problem.

When we express concern about the presence of alcohol in skincare or makeup products, we're referring to denatured ethanol, which most often is listed as SD alcohol, alcohol denat., denatured alcohol, or (less often) isopropyl alcohol.

When you see these types of alcohol listed among the first six ingredients on an ingredient label, without question the product will irritate and cause other problems for skin. There's no way around it—these volatile alcohols are simply bad for all skin types.

The reason they're included in products is because they provide a quick-drying finish, immediately degrease skin, and feel weightless, so it's easy to see their appeal, especially for those with oily skin. If only those short-term benefits didn't lead to negative long-term outcomes!

Using products that contain these alcohols will cause dryness, erosion of skin's protective barrier, and a strain on how skin replenishes, renews, and rejuvenates itself. Alcohol just weakens everything about skin.

The irony of using alcohol-based products to control oily skin is that the damage from the alcohol can actually lead to an increase in breakouts and enlarged pores. As we said, the alcohol does have an immediate de-greasing effect on skin, but it causes irritation, which eventually will counteract the de-greasing effect and make your oily skin look even more shiny.

There are people who challenge us on the information we've presented about alcohol's effects. They often base their argument on a study in the British Journal of Dermatology (July 2007, pages 74–81) that concluded "alcohol-based hand rubs cause less irritation than hand washing…." But, the only thing this study showed was that alcohol was not as irritating as an even more irritating hand wash, which contained sodium lauryl sulfate. So, the study is actually just telling you that one irritant, sodium lauryl sulfate, is worse than another irritant, alcohol.

Not all alcohols are bad. For example, there are fatty alcohols, which are absolutely non-irritating and can be beneficial for skin. Examples that you'll see on ingredient labels include cetyl alcohol, stearyl alcohol, and cetearyl alcohol, all of which are good ingredients for skin. It's important to differentiate between these skin-friendly alcohols and the problematic alcohols.

References for this information:

Chemical Immunology and Allergy, March 2012, pages 77–80

Aging, March 2012, pages 166–175

Journal of Occupational Medicine and Toxicology, November 2008, pages 1–16

Dermato-Endocrinology, January 2011, pages 41–49

Experimental Dermatology, June 2008, pages 542–551

Clinical Dermatology, September-October 2004, pages 360–366

Alcohol Journal, April 2002, pages 179–190

Jar Packaging: No
Tested on animals: Yes

experience superior peel results in one convenient step - at home - with zero downtime. the microdelivery triple-acid brightening peel delivers advanced anti-aging and skin-brightening results through an advanced triple-acid formula that dissolves and sweeps away dull, dead skin cells and impurities. plus, a unique skin-brightening technology visibly reduces the appearance of dark spots and discoloration, for a revitalized, luminous complexion.

Aqua/Water/Eau, Alcohol Denat., Glycereth-7 Triacetate, Mandelic Acid, Niacinamide, Glycolic Acid, Sodium Hydroxide, Malic Acid, OEG-8/SMDI Copolymer, Arginine, PPG-26-Buteth-26, Glycerin, Bisabolol, PEG-40 Hydrogenated Castor Oil, Hibiscus Sabdariffa Flower Extract, Adenosine, Sargassum Muticum Extract, Magnesium Hydroxide, Farnesol.

philosophy At-A-Glance

Strengths: Relatively inexpensive;some of the best products are fragrance-free; very good retinol products; selection of state-of-the-art moisturizers; innovative skin-lightening product.

Weaknesses: Irritating and/or drying cleansers; average to problematic scrubs; at-home peel kits far more gimmicky than helpful; several products contain lavender oil; several products include irritating essential oils;the majority of makeup items do not rise above average status.

Believe in miracles. That's the "lifestyle" branding statement philosophy makes, which is an approach that is decidedly different from their former positioning, which encompassed family values and spirituality along with a dash of department-store lan and endearingly clever quips. The miracle angle may grab your attention, but the company is also quick to point out that its history is steeped in providing products to dermatologists and plastic surgeons worldwide (so, in addition to miracles, philosophy has a serious side, too). Although its heritage may have included providing clinically oriented products to doctors,we have yet to see or hear of any medical professional retailing philosophy products. And that's a good thing because, by and large, most of philosophy products are resounding disappointments. Moreover, several products, including almost all of their sunscreens, contain one or more known skin irritants. We would be extremely suspicious of a dermatologist or plastic surgeon who recommended such products to their patients, and even more so if they actually believed some of the more farfetched claims philosophy makes.

Interestingly, when you shop this line at department stores or at the cosmetics boutique Sephora, what you'll notice is the preponderance of food- and drink-scented bath products, all in vivid colors or cutely boxed for gift-giving. It seems that somewhere along the way, the company decided to promote these nose-appeal products while downplaying their more serious-minded, simply packaged skin care. Perhaps the body lotions and bubble baths have become philosophy's bread and butter. Given the hit-or-miss nature of their facial-care products, that's not surprising. Then again, they've also heavily promoted their anti-aging-themed Miracle Worker products...

So what's to like if you're into the vibe philosophy puts out? Well, this is still a line with some well-formulated staples, including an AHA product, some retinol options, and a handful of state-of-the-art moisturizers. The products that get the most promotion at the counter are the ones you should avoid, such as the at-home peels, scrubs, pads, and anti-acne products. However, the somewhat confusing, conflicting image philosophy presents shouldn't keep you from considering their best productsbut it's not a lifestyle brand in the sense that using the entire line will somehow bring you a more joyful existence, or significantly improved skin. The philosophy line is now ownedCoty, a cosmetics brand primarily known for their fragrances.Their acquisition ofphilosophy is their first major foray into a widely-distributed skin care brand.

For more information about philosophy, call (800) 568-3151 or visit www.philosophy.com.

Note: philosophy opts to use lowercase letters for every product they sell, so the listings below are simply following suit.

About the Experts

The Beautypedia team consists of skin care and makeup experts personally trained by the original Cosmetics Cop and best-selling beauty author, Paula Begoun. We’re fascinated by skin care and makeup products and thrilled when they meet or exceed our expectations, but we’re also disappointed when they fail to perform as claimed, are wildly overpriced, or contain ingredients scientific research has proven can hurt skin.

Our mission has always been to help you find the best products for your skin, no matter your budget or preferences. Beautypedia’s thorough and insightful reviews cut through the hype and provide reliable recommendations for all ages, skin types, and skin tones.