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Youth To The People Reviews

Superfood Firm and Brighten Serum

1.00 fl. oz. for $ 62.00
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Ingredients

Brand Overview

Youth To The People’s Superfood Firm and Brighten Serum truly does contain ingredients that research shows can help visibly firm and brighten skin, but a couple things hold the formula back from maximum effectiveness.

Housed in a clear glass bottle and dispensed via pump, Superfood Firm and Brighten Serum has a non-oily, nearly water-light consistency that spreads easily across skin and absorbs quickly—traits which make it ideal for combination to oily skin

It’s worth mentioning that the vitamin C in this serum has been shown to help improve uneven skin tone, and the palmitoyl tripeptide-5 plays a role in visibly improving firmness. There are also several soothing and hydrating ingredients on hand + antioxidants aplenty to help defend skin from pollution and free-radical damage.

In case you’re wondering about kale being called out as a superstar ingredient, at the time of this review there isn’t a ton of research on its topical benefits for skin, but at least a couple studies indicate that it has skin-repairing and anti-inflammatory properties.

Keep in mind that the see-through bottle can allow the light-sensitive ingredients (including the superstar vitamin C and peptides) to degrade prematurely, so you’ll need to keep it stored in a place that limits routine exposure to natural light (i.e. in a drawer).

We also have to mention that the formula contains fragrance, which can irritate skin. Granted the concentration is minimal and the scent is pretty much non-discernible, so we aren’t overly concerned, but fragrance free is always the ideal way to go for the health of your skin.

With just a couple tweaks, Superfood Firm and Brighten Serum would be perfect.

Note: YTTP includes several good-for-skin acids in this product but none of their claims are related to them (nor are they called out as featured key ingredients by the brand).

Pros:
  • Contains vitamin C to brighten skin and palmitoyl tripeptide-5 to improve firmness.
  • Beneficial blend of antioxidants + soothing and hydrating ingredients.
  • Water-light consistency that spreads easily across skin and absorbs quickly.
Cons:
  • See-through packaging must be kept away from routine exposure to natural light.
  • Contains fragrance (albeit in minimal concentration) that risks irritating skin.
Jar Packaging: No
Tested on animals: No

A high-performance firming and brightening serum loaded with superfoods—kale and spinach—for a bright, healthy-looking complexion.

Water, Lactic Acid, Citric Acid, Malic Acid, Glycerin, Palmitoyl Tripeptide-5, Magnesium Ascorbyl Phosphate (Vitamin C), Butylene Glycol, Brassica Oleracea (Kale) Leaf Extract, Spinacia Oleracea (Spinach) Leaf Extract, Camellia Sinensis (Green Tea) Leaf Extract, Chamomile Recutita (Matricaria) Flower Extract, Medicago Sativa (Alfalfa) Leaf Extract, Aloe Barbadensis (Aloe Vera) Leaf Extract, Sodium Hyaluronate Crosspolymer, Panthenol (Vitamin B5), Heptyl Glucoside, Hydroxyethylcellulose, Sodium Hyaluronate, Fragrance, Superoxide Dismutase, L-Tyrosine, Sodium Citrate, Magnesium Chloride, Pentylene Glycol, Ethylhexylglycerin, Phenoxyethanol, Potassium Sorbate, Sodium Benzoate.

Youth To The People is the creation of cousins Greg Gonzalez and Joe Cloyes, whose decision to start a skin care company was a roundabout way to continue the family business. Their grandmother was an esthetician whose own line of products, Eva’s Esthetics, is sold in spas and salons throughout California. Inspired by seeing her work over the years, the pair decided to start their own line, but with the focus being on vegan, superfood-focused products.

To that end, most of Youth To The People’s products feature well-known “green” ingredients such as kale, spinach, and berries. While appealing to people’s desire for natural, these ingredients are also rich in antioxidants, so there’s research-backed merit to their inclusion beyond the marketing appeal.

The brand speaks a lot about science and uses lab-created (synthetic) ingredients as well, including hyaluronic acid and peptides, so it’s good to see both sides being embraced. That’s because skin needs a mix of naturally-occurring and synthetic ingredients to look and feel its best. Natural can’t address every skin care need on its own.

There’s also some talk about “adaptogenic” ingredients in a couple of products, which is the concept that these ingredients, once applied, can adapt to skin’s needs in certain ways to create certain results. There’s less science showing this can actually happen, though all the adaptogenic ingredients used here have antioxidant benefits as well so they’re certainly not wasted--well, at least when packaged correctly.

Most of the products are good, though none of them are without a couple of missteps. In some cases, it’s the inclusion of fragrance (and fragrance, even naturally-derived, puts skin at risk of irritation), in others jar packaging and the problems it presents for natural ingredients. While jars look pretty, they expose all those wonderful antioxidant ingredients to light and air, which over time breaks them down, leading to lost effectiveness.

To learn more about Youth To The People, visit https://www.youthtothepeople.com/.

About the Experts

The Beautypedia team consists of skin care and makeup experts personally trained by the original Cosmetics Cop and best-selling beauty author, Paula Begoun. We’re fascinated by skin care and makeup products and thrilled when they meet or exceed our expectations, but we’re also disappointed when they fail to perform as claimed, are wildly overpriced, or contain ingredients scientific research has proven can hurt skin.

Our mission has always been to help you find the best products for your skin, no matter your budget or preferences. Beautypedia’s thorough and insightful reviews cut through the hype and provide reliable recommendations for all ages, skin types, and skin tones.

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