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GlamGlow

SUPERCLEANSE Clearing Cream-to-Foam Cleanser

5.00 fl. oz. for $ 32.00
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Brand Overview

Glamglow is known for their range of facial masks, but they've dipped their toes into the cleansing category over the last few years, and their most recent addition is this product whose claims sound similar to many of the masks they sell. Unfortunately, SUPERCLEANSE Clearing Cream-to-Foam Cleanser is a problem for all skin types, even though it cleanses thoroughly and rinses easily.

This tube-dispensed mask's biggest issue is the inclusion of peppermint oil and eucalyptus, both irritating ingredients, especially in a product that's going to be used around the eyes.

Other issues include the claims about detoxing skin, as this isn't possible from skincare (see More Info for details).

This also doesn't contain "powerful actives," although we're not quite sure what they mean by that statement. The charcoal and carbon absorb and help remove impurities from skin, but they're not "active" other than the nature of how absorbent ingredients work. If anything, the claim is overstated rather than untrue.

Last, Glamglow claims that the AHA ingredients glycolic and lactic acids exfoliate skin, but this cleanser's pH and the low amount of the AHAs prevent that from happening.

In the end, you're left with a cleanser that contains a less-than-gentle cleansing agent and some problematic plant ingredients that make this impossible to recommend. See our list of Best Cleansers for preferred options.

Pros:
  • Cleanses thoroughly.
  • Rinses easily.
Cons:
  • Cannot detox skin as claimed.
  • Doesn't contain "powerful actives."
  • The eucalyptus and peppermint are skin irritants.
  • The amount of AHA ingredients is too low to exfoliate skin.
  • Fragrant formula poses a risk of irritating skin and eyes.
More Info:

Why Beauty Products Cannot Detoxify Your Skin: Despite the claims of many cosmetics companies, you cannot "detox" your skin. Brands that make this claim never really specify exactly what substances or toxins their products are supposed to eliminate, which makes sense, because your skin does not store toxins.

Toxins are classified according to whether they are produced by the body or are introduced into the body, usually through eating or inhaling. Toxins are produced by plants, animals, insects, reptiles (think snake venom and bee stings), and so on. Toxins also can be inorganic, such as heavy metals like lead, arsenic, and others.

When it comes to your skin, toxins cannot leave your body through your skin or sebaceous (oil) glands—it's physiologically impossible. Other parts of your body, mainly your kidneys and liver, handle the process of "detoxifying" just fine, as long as you have a healthy diet.

There are a handful of studies indicating that sweat acts as a carrier in "detoxifying" by removing trace heavy metals from the body; however, the methodology of those studies is considered questionable when reviewed by third-party experts.

Nonetheless, if you choose to sauna, steam, or exercise to increase sweating, that's a lifestyle option to discuss with your physician, but it does absolutely nothing as a purifying skincare activity.

Skincare products are not going to "detox" your body or skin. As we always say: Stick to what the research says really works, and ignore the fantasy claims because they aren't going to help your skin or your budget!

References for this information:

Journal of Human Nutrition and Dietetics, December 2015, pages 675–686

Journal of Environmental and Public Health, 2012, pages 1–10

http://www.health.harvard.edu/staying-healthy/the-dubious-practice-of-detox

http://www.berkeleywellness.com/healthy-eating/diet-weight-loss/nutrition/article/truth-about-detox-diets

Jar Packaging: No
Tested on animals: Yes
Formulated with powerful actives for super-clean, glowing skin, this must-have creamy cleanser transforms into a luxurious foam to blast away impurities and remove pore-clogging debris. The pore refining triple charcoal complex contains three charcoalscoconut, ubame white oak, and gray bambooto detox skin, while botanical ingredients like TEAOXI eucalyptus leaf, licorice root, and cumin seed purify. Skin-refining, powerful AHAs support natural cell turnover and renewal, while K17 and Mediterranean clays absorb oils to mattify skin and restore balance to your complexion. Skin is visibly improved after each cleanse, with a diminished appearance of pores and a refined texture and tone.
Water, Sodium C14-16 Olefin Sulfonate, Magnesium Aluminum Silicate, Sodium Cocoamphoacetate, Cetearyl Alcohol, Glyceryl Stearate, Glycerin, Charcoal Powder, Propanediol, Kaolin, Carbon, Eucalyptus Globulus Leaf Powder, Mentha Piperita (Peppermint) Oil, Glycyrrhiza Glabra (Licorice) Root Extract, Nigella Sativa Seed Extract, Ethylhexylglycerin, Sodium Chloride, Glyceryl Polyacrylate, Cocamidopropyl Hydroxysultaine, Xanthan Gum, Caprylyl Glycol, Lactic Acid, Glycolic Acid, Fragrance (Parfum), Linalool, Benzyl Benzoate, Phenoxyethanol, Titanium Dioxide (Ci 77891).

GlamGlow At-A-Glance

Strengths: None, unfortunately. Well, their packaging is pretty.

Weaknesses: Despite the hype, GlamGlow does not have exceptional, or even mediocre, products worth considering. Their primary two masks are overpriced and offer a mix of ordinary clays, potent fragrance and irritating plant extracts with a few beneficial antioxidants present but they are rendered useless because of the jar packaging.

Created by the husband-and-wife team of Glenn and Shannon Dellimore, the Hollywood, California-based GlamGlow line consists of several masks and cleansers. Their marketing claims may have you thinking these masks are revolutionary skin-care treatments but they are notnot even slightly. GlamGlow also claims their masks are sought out by actors and celebrities for their ability to "tighten skin and shrink pores". The celebrity allure is a good one, as most of us want to know what the stars use to get or stay gorgeous, but celebrity cache alone isn't a great reason to try any product. A lot of celebrities do things that aren't good for them, like smoke, tan, or drink too much, and they make skin care and cosmetic surgery mistakes too.

But back to the masks. The GlamGlow masks contain fragrant essential oils, irritating plant extracts and ordinary clays (despite being named "French clay", in the world of skin-care formulation, clay is just clay and being from France is as special as a French fry is to a potato).

The reality behind the ingredients used in the GlamGlow line is much less interesting than the story would lead you to believe. Aside from the mix of clay and fragrance, their "hero ingredient" is the trade-named ingredient called "Teoxi", which is just green-tea extract. While green-tea extract is an excellent antioxidant, isnt capable of the the skin perfecting, Benjamin Button-age-reversing results promised. As the body's largest organ, your skin is far too complex to have its anti-aging needs met by one antioxidant, however good it may be. But even if green-tea extract were as amazing as GlamGlow asserts, it wont remain stable in the jar packaging the company chose for their masks.

Aside from "Teoxi", GlamGlow uses trade names instead of using the actual ingredient name in their marketing claims, on both the box and their website. You may think "Teoxi" sounds impressive, but you're only getting standard ingredientstheir use of trade names simply makes the formula seem more intriguing than it really is. For example, their "Bio-Life-Cell-Science" technology claims to be an "Advanced Scientific Skincare" blend, but in reality it's just a mix of eucalyptus, peppermint, comfrey, ivy, marigold and other standard plant extracts. It would take some advanced scientific Photoshopping to get anti-wrinkle/anti-blemish results from this cast of ordinary problematic ingredients!

If you're interested in a clay mask for absorbing excess oil or helping clogged pores, there are many alternatives which easily beat GlamGlow for a fraction of the cost. There is nothing unique about the masks this line sells.

GlamGlow also makes exfoliating claims, but these don't live up to their promise for reasons discussed in each mask's reviews. You are better off using a soft washcloth with your cleanser for physical exfoliationyou will get virtually identical results and save your skin the irritation (plus spare your bank account the wasted money). If brighter, more even-toned skin is your goal, consider any of the well-formulated AHA/BHA exfoliants recommended in the Best Products section.

In the end, despite lots of hype, GlamGlow is a disappointment that isn't worth the expense and puts your skin at risk of irritation. If only a fraction of the marketing efforts behind the brand were put into formulating their products, they might have ended up with products truly deserving of celebrity accolades!

For more information about GlamGlow, email at info@glamglowmud.com or visit www.glamglowmud.com (there is no available phone number).

Note: As of January 2015, GlamGlow has been acquired by Estee Lauder.

About the Experts

The Beautypedia team consists of skin care and makeup experts personally trained by the original Cosmetics Cop and best-selling beauty author, Paula Begoun. We’re fascinated by skin care and makeup products and thrilled when they meet or exceed our expectations, but we’re also disappointed when they fail to perform as claimed, are wildly overpriced, or contain ingredients scientific research has proven can hurt skin.

Our mission has always been to help you find the best products for your skin, no matter your budget or preferences. Beautypedia’s thorough and insightful reviews cut through the hype and provide reliable recommendations for all ages, skin types, and skin tones.