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First Aid Beauty

Skin Rescue Deep Cleanser with Red Clay

4.70 fl. oz. for $ 24.00
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Claims

Ingredients

Brand Overview

First Aid Beauty claims Skin Rescue Deep Cleanser with Red Clay detoxifies skin and controls oil production, but as we'll explain, that's just not possible

Let's begin by debunking the age old "detoxifying skin" myth. Simply put, skin can't be detoxified the way this product (or any skincare product for that matter) claims, and more to the point, toxins aren't the reason your pores are clogged or why your skin is oily. We explain this via supporting research in the More Info section.

There's also the misleading notion that this cleanser can regulate oil production—again, something a cleanser cannot do. It can wash away oil at the surface level just like any other cleanser, but that's it. Oil is produced by hormonal activity not something a cleanser can impact in any way.

We're also a little concerned by how fragrant the rosemary oil is in this formula. The scent is potent enough that someone with sensitive skin should steer clear.

In the end, you're left with a gel cleanser that can't "rescue" skin as claimed and may actually aggravate it via the fragrance component. Get superior results with one of the gentle yet effective options on our Best Cleansers list instead—and many of those come in more generous sizes than this one.

Pros:
  • Removes makeup and oil.
  • Gel formula rinses without leaving a residue on skin.
Cons:
  • Contains potentially irritating rosemary oil.
  • Cannot detoxify skin or regulate oil production as claimed.
More Info:Despite the claims many cosmetics companies make, you cannot "detox" your skin because your skin does not store toxins.

Toxins are classified as being produced by the body or introduced into the body, usually through eating or inhaling. They can be produced by plants, animals, insects, reptiles (think snake venom or bee stings), etc. They also can be inorganic, such as heavy metals like lead, arsenic, and others.

When it comes to your skin, toxins cannot leave your body through your skin or oil glands. It is physiologically impossible. Other parts of your body, mainly your kidneys and liver, handle the process of "detoxifying" just fine as long as you maintain a healthy diet.

It should be pointed out that there are a handful of studies showing sweat can be a carrier of "detoxifying" certain trace heavy metals out of the body. However, the methodology of those studies is considered questionable. Nonetheless, if you choose to sauna, steam, or exercise to increase sweating that is a lifestyle option to discuss with your physician, but has absolutely nothing to do with skincare.

Skincare products are not going to detox your body or skin. As we always urge, stick to what the research says really works, and ignore the fantasy claims because they aren't helping your skin or your budget.

References for this information:

Journal of Human Nutrition and Dietetics, December 2015, pages 675-686

Journal of Environmental and Public Health, 2012, volume 2012, pages 1-10

http://www.health.harvard.edu/staying-healthy/the-dubious-practice-of-detox

http://www.berkeleywellness.com/healthy-eating/diet-weight-loss/nutrition/article/truth-about-detox-diets

Jar Packaging: No
Tested on animals: No

Cleanses and detoxifies the skin. Unclogs and minimizes pores. Balances the skin and controls oil production.

Water, Sodium Lauroyl Sarcosinate, Cocamidopropyl Betaine, Glycerin, PEG-120 Methyl Glucose Dioleate, Acrylates/Steareth-20 Methacrylate Copolymer, Dipropylene Glycol, Camellia Sinensis Leaf Extract, Chrysanthemum Parthenium (Feverfew) Extract, Glycyrrhiza Uralensis (Licorice) Root Extract, Bisabolol, Rosmarinus Officinalis (Rosemary) Leaf Oil, Allantoin, Acrylates/C10-30 Alkyl Acrylate Crosspolymer, Panthenol, Illite, Potassium Hydroxide, Disodium EDTA, Mica, Caprylyl Glycol, Phenoxyethanol, Iron Oxides (CI 77491).

First Aid Beauty At-A-Glance

Strengths: Several fragrance-free products; relatively reasonable pricing; sunscreen provides broad-spectrum protection; wonderful fragrance-free body wash.

Weaknesses: AHA pads contain a low amount of glycolic and lactic acids; some products contain fragrant plant extracts; every product contains feverfew extract, which has benefits, but also can be an irritant; jar packaging; for a line meant for sensitive skin, their use of common irritants is disappointing.

With a name like First Aid Beauty (FAB for short), it's obvious this line is meant to rescue your skin from distress, and, indeed, these products are targeted toward those who have sensitive, easily irritated skin, but who still want an elegant, department-store flair. Ironically, FAB falls short on both ends of the spectrum.

Despite the company's claims of providing "therapeutic action" for "tough skin conditions," some of the products contain irritating ingredients that are extremely problematic for any skin type, especially for those with sensitive or compromised skin. It was disappointing to see known irritants like sulfur, balsam resin, and witch hazel in products claiming to calm your skin and reduce redness. "What were they thinking?" was a question that came up more than once while reviewing this line!

On the bright side, First Aid Beauty does have a very good fragrance-free body wash. There are also a few products that omit the fragrance, which is a definite must for sensitive skin, although, in fact, all skin types do best with fragrance-free products. Unfortunately, the fragrance-free formulas in this line come up short on important ingredients, like antioxidants and skin-repairing ingredients.

It is best to avoid their Ultra Repair Cream, the SPF 30 sunscreen, Detox Eye Roller, Blemish Eraser, and the Anti-Redness Serum because they all contain enough irritating ingredients to make conditions like acne, redness, and sensitivity worse.

For more information about First Aid Beauty, visit your local Sephora or Ulta or call (800) 322-3619 or visit www.firstaidbeauty.com.

About the Experts

The Beautypedia team consists of skin care and makeup experts personally trained by the original Cosmetics Cop and best-selling beauty author, Paula Begoun. We’re fascinated by skin care and makeup products and thrilled when they meet or exceed our expectations, but we’re also disappointed when they fail to perform as claimed, are wildly overpriced, or contain ingredients scientific research has proven can hurt skin.

Our mission has always been to help you find the best products for your skin, no matter your budget or preferences. Beautypedia’s thorough and insightful reviews cut through the hype and provide reliable recommendations for all ages, skin types, and skin tones.

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