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RoC

Retinol Correxion Deep Wrinkle Daily Moisturizer SPF 30

1.00 fl. oz. for $ 24.99
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Ingredients

Brand Overview

Roc’s Retinol Correxion Deep Wrinkle Daily Moisturizer SPF 30 has been reformulated, but not for the better. Still packaged in an opaque, medicinal-looking tube, this daytime moisturizer for normal to dry skin falls down by including too much fragrance and not enough anti-aging power. It’s not a good option if your concern is improving deep wrinkles and expression lines.

The rich cream texture smooths on and feels quite moisturizing without being heavy or greasy. Once set, this wears well under makeup.

As with the previous formula, the broad spectrum sun protection comes from an in-part avobenzone sunscreen stabilized with the synthetic ingredient diethylhexyl 2,6-naphthalate. Neutrogena uses this stabilizer in several of its sunscreen formulas; both Neutrogena and RoC are owned by Johnson & Johnson.

This contains the antioxidant trifecta of vitamins A (as retinol), C (ascorbic acid) and E (tocopheryl acetate) but all except vitamin E is present in lower amounts than the unnecessary fragrance, which poses a risk of irritating skin and eyes.

It’s truly disappointing you’re not getting more anti-aging benefits for your money. Check out our list of best retinol products for better options.

Pros:
  • Rich but not heavy-feeling cream texture softens dry skin.
  • Provides broad-spectrum sun protection.
  • Works well under makeup.
Cons:
  • Fragrant formula poses a risk of irritating skin, especially around the eyes.
  • Contains more fragrance than anti-aging ingredients like retinol and vitamin C.
  • Underperforms in terms of benefits for deep wrinkles.
Jar Packaging: No
Tested on animals: Yes

Helps visibly reduce the appearance of expression lines and deep wrinkles, while protecting your skin from the sun’s harmful rays.

Active Ingredients: Avobenzone (3%), Homosalate (10%), Octocrylene (3%), Oxybenzone (5%). Inactive Ingredients: Water, Glycerin, Tetrahydroxypropyl Ethylenediamine, Dimethicone, Cyclohexasiloxane, Butylene Glycol, Butyrospermum Parkii (Shea) Butter, Squalane, PPG-2 Myristyl Ether Propionate, Pentaerythityl Tetraethylhexanoate, Cetyl Alcohol, Glyceryl Stearate, Diethylhexyl 2,6-Naphthalate, Styrene/Acrylates Copolymer, Aluminum Starch Octenylsuccinate, PEG-75 Stearate, Polyacrylamide, Glycolic Acid, Phenoxyethanol, Pentylene Glycol, Ammonium Acryloyldimethyltaurate/VP Copolymer, C13-14 Isoparaffin, Ceteth-20, Steareth-20, Methylparaben, Tocopheryl Acetate, Fragrance, Propylparaben, Ethylparaben, Laureth-7, BHT, Disodium EDTA, Cyclopentasiloxane, p-Anisic Acid, Polysorbate 20, Retinol, Ascorbic Acid, Hydroxyphenyl Propamidobenzoic Acid, Sodium Hydroxide.

RoC At-A-Glance

Strengths: Some well-packaged products with retinol; all the sunscreens provide sufficient UVA protection.

Weaknesses: Mediocrity reigns supremefew of the formulas are particularly exciting; antiwrinkle claims tend to go too far; jar packaging.

Originally the brainchild of a French pharmacist, RoC does its best to convince women concerned with wrinkles that using RoC products will erase those pesky lines and, of course, that RoC is the only company that keeps its promises. That doesn't bode well for the other J&J product lines Aveeno and Neutrogenawouldn't that mean they must be lying about the promises they make for their products? Regardless, the promises RoC makes, including all of the same old same old "you will look younger too" rubbish, aren't viable and don't hold up under closer scrutiny. None of what they assure you their products can do is possible beyond a cosmetic extent, and moreover the majority of RoC's U.S.- and Canada-sold formulas are either boring or one-note. They don't even come through with distinctive or interesting moisturizers.

For example, RoC is big on retinol, and includes it in products with and without sunscreen in the United States. Retinol is a cell-communicating ingredient as well as an antioxidant, and its benefits for skin are many (Sources: Archives of Dermatology, May 2007, pages 606612; Skin Pharmacology and Physiology, March/April 2005, pages 8187; and Journal of Cosmetic Dermatology, December 2005, pages 237244). However, for the most part, the amount of retinol in RoC's U.S.-sold products is barely a dusting, and so your skin won't receive much, if any, benefit from it. Ironically, although RoC promotes retinol much more than Neutrogena and Aveeno (all are J&J-owned companies), the latter two lines sell better retinol products! Several of the moisturizers with retinol sold by RoC in Canada also have much better formulations.

Another ingredient RoC has been touting lately is DMAE (dimethyl MEA). This ingredient is described in detail in the reviews below, but suffice it to say that DMAE isn't a panacea for wrinkles or skin that has lost firmness. Lastly, soy is promoted by RoC as an anti-aging powerhouse. Soy has antioxidant and anti-inflammatory benefits for skin, but once again RoC shortchanges the consumer by including barely any of it. And it's probably no surprise that sister company Aveeno (and, to a lesser extent, Neutrogena) offers better (and less expensive) options if soy is what you want to try.

Taken together, isn't it interesting how all of these Johnson & Johnson brands offer similar products to different target audiences? Neutrogena is the all-encompassing line, going after consumers battling acne and wrinkles; Aveeno stresses its "Active Naturals" and plays on its oat heritage; RoC is made to appeal to consumers who want to take a serious, more clinical-minded approach to fighting the signs of aging. None of these lines have all the answers, but all of them have a few worthwhile products. It's just that with RoC, those looking for state-of-the-art options beyond retinol have the fewest choicesand that's a promise made clear by the reviews that follow!

For more information about RoC, call (800) 762-1964 or visit www.rocskincare.com. And for a better selection of state-of-the-art retinol products from RoC, see the reviews for RoC Canada.

About the Experts

The Beautypedia team consists of skin care and makeup experts personally trained by the original Cosmetics Cop and best-selling beauty author, Paula Begoun. We’re fascinated by skin care and makeup products and thrilled when they meet or exceed our expectations, but we’re also disappointed when they fail to perform as claimed, are wildly overpriced, or contain ingredients scientific research has proven can hurt skin.

Our mission has always been to help you find the best products for your skin, no matter your budget or preferences. Beautypedia’s thorough and insightful reviews cut through the hype and provide reliable recommendations for all ages, skin types, and skin tones.