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Lancer Skincare

Retexturizing Treatment Cream Glycolic Acid 10x

1.70 fl. oz. for $ 75.00
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Ingredients

Brand Overview

The Retexturizing Treatment Cream Glycolic Acid 10x is, true to the name, a 10% glycolic acid exfoliant formulated at an effective pH of 3.8-4.0. In addition to glycolic acid, Lancer included a blend of skin-identical ingredients, plant-based fatty acids and emollients—this is a formula better suited to those with combination to dry skin. Those with oily skin may find this cream too moisturizing.

At 10% strength, and when a broad-spectrum SPF is used daily, Retexturizing Treatment Cream will make good on its promises of improving the texture, tone and appearance of skin, especially on those areas discolored due to sun damage.

Just a note, AHA cannot exfoliate inside the pores due to its inability to penetrate—BHA (salicylic acid) is the preferred choice for those battling clogged pores. Thus, despite the marketing messaging indicating that this AHA will "open pores"; it isn't the ideal option for such a concern. And of course, pores do not open and close like window blinds. A pore is always "open" but it can become clogged, which is where the whole confusion of closed/open pores comes from.

The only reason this earned a GOOD and didn't rank a Beautypedia BEST is the uncertainty around the amount of lavender oil in the formula. Lavender oil is a rather iffy ingredient due to the relatively low amounts needed to exert irritant response on skin. It's not as clear how much is present, but the scent of lavender is apparent when applying to skin.

Those with sensitive skin should special note, as the added presence of fragrance in combination with a 10% ascorbic acid treatment may prove to be more than their skin can tolerate.

Pros:
  • Contains 10% glycolic acid at an effective pH of 3.8-4.0.
  • More than just an AHA, this contains added moisturizing and skin-identical ingredients.
Cons:
  • Contains added fragrance (albeit at a low level) in the form of lavender oil.
Jar Packaging: No
Tested on animals: No

This lightweight, moisturizing cream uses 10% glycolic acid and cell-function optimizers to help speed cell turnover, lighten discolorations, open pores, and enhance the effect of other treatments.

Water (Aqua), Glycolic Acid, C12-15 Alkyl Benzoate, Cyclopentasiloxane, Cetearyl Alcohol, Glycerin, Glyceryl Stearate, PEG-100 Stearate, Polyacrylamide, Dimethicone, Cetearyl Glucoside, Squalane, Ammonium Hydroxide, Phenoxyethanol, C13-13 Isoparaffin, Tocopheryl Acetate, Camellia Sinensis Leaf Extract, Sodium Hyaluronate, Hydrolyzed Glycosaminoglycans, Ubiquinone, Phospholipids, Retinyl Palmitate, Ascorbyl Palmitate, Xanthan Gum, Sodium Benzoate, Laureth-7, Disodium EDTA, Lavandula Angustifolia (Lavender) Oil, Linalool.

Strengths: Has a good option for 10% vitamin C treatment; Their 10% AHA moisturizer is a worth considering for those who have dry skin.

Weaknesses: Expensive; some products with light- and air-sensitive ingredients are packaged in jars; overly abrasive scrub.

Dr. Harold Lancer is a Beverly Hills dermatologist with celebrity clientele, two credentials that pique the interest of many women interested in skin care. His specialty is cosmetic rejuvenation and, like many dermatologists before him, Lancer has his own line of products: Lancer Dermatology Skincare.

Lancer's skin-care line is built around four steps: polish, cleanse, nourish, and protect. According to Lancer, these steps work for every skin type or aging concern. The polish (i.e. scrub) step involves applying a fairly abrasive, alkaline scrub before cleansing. Lancer's idea is that the polish loosens soil and cellular debris, which the cleanser you apply next will easily wash away.

After you cleanse, you're supposed to nourish skin with an anti-aging moisturizer. During the day, you're advised to protect your skin with sunscreen and, occasionally, if needed, you can apply a treatment product (such as a vitamin C cream).

Although Lancer's method is being hailed as unique or somehow different, it's ultimately nothing new to the skin-care industry: Exfoliation is necessary for younger-looking skin (but scrubs arent the best way to get this benefit), sun protection is vital, and a moisturizer loaded with skin-repairing ingredients helps replace what young skin produces naturally before it becomes damaged.

The polish (scrub) before the cleansing step is a new twist, but it's actually a problem if you're wearing makeup. Scrubbing skin before you remove your makeup will grind the makeup deeper into your pores, making it harder for the cleanser to remove. If anything, you should cleanse first, polish second.

Although Lancer's method is being hailed as unique or somehow different, it's about as interesting as white bread. If anything, it's a mix of dated and modern concepts built on information that researchers have known about for years: Exfoliation is necessary for younger-looking skin (but scrubbing isn't the best way to get this benefit), sun protection is vital, and a moisturizer loaded with skin-repairing ingredients helps replace what young skin produces naturally before it becomes damaged.

Unfortunately, Lancers scrubs are all alkaline (high pH) and contain overly abrasive scrub ingredients and fragrance extracts that skin doesnt need. The nighttime moisturizers are all packaged in jars (exposing their beneficial ingredients to air), and the one sunscreen in the line is alcohol based (which isnt a good thing for skin, as well discuss in the product review).

There are some highlights in the line, such as good options for a 10% vitamin C treatment and AHA exfoliant, but ultimately you dont need to spend this much to have healthy, younger-looking skin. In fact, because many of Lancer's products contain one or more problematic ingredients, you may end up thinking, why bother?

For more information about Lancer Dermatology Skincare, call (310) 278-8444 or visit http://www.lancerskincare.com/.

About the Experts

The Beautypedia team consists of skin care and makeup experts personally trained by the original Cosmetics Cop and best-selling beauty author, Paula Begoun. We’re fascinated by skin care and makeup products and thrilled when they meet or exceed our expectations, but we’re also disappointed when they fail to perform as claimed, are wildly overpriced, or contain ingredients scientific research has proven can hurt skin.

Our mission has always been to help you find the best products for your skin, no matter your budget or preferences. Beautypedia’s thorough and insightful reviews cut through the hype and provide reliable recommendations for all ages, skin types, and skin tones.

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