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philosophy

purity made simple eye hydra-bounce eye gel

0.05 fl. oz. for $ 24.00
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philosophy has expanded its purity made simple collection from rinse-off cleanser and makeup removers to leave-on products, including purity made simple eye hydra-bounce eye gel. The formula is suitable for all skin types and despite some great ingredients, a few factors keep this from ranking among the best eye gels out there.

This isn’t a classic gel or cream-gel texture, it’s really a lightweight, exceptionally hydrating but bouncy-to-the touch cream. We suspect this contains a higher-than-usual amount of glycerin, which would give it that long-lasting feel of moisture that the emollients and fatty acids help lock in place. In short, this is great for dehydrated skin around the eyes (but do check out the More Info section to learn why you might not need an eye gel at all).

Interestingly, this has a subtle cooling effect, not really enough to call out in the claims like philosophy does. We also don’t see any traditional cooling ingredients like menthol, although the small amount of denatured alcohol (likely too low to irritate skin) might be contributing a bit.

Along with the hydrating ingredients come nourishing non-fragrant plant oils like meadowfoam, chia seed, and olive as well as soothing ingredients for puffy eyes, like bisabolol and green tea. Sadly, because these ingredients are sensitive to air and light, philosophy’s choice of jar packaging (which continuously exposes them to both elements and degrades their effectiveness over time) is a problem. See More Info for details on this as well.

Along with the packaging issue, this eye gel contains a couple of problem-child ingredients that prevent us from rating it better. Bitter orange and angelica root extracts both present a risk of irritating skin due to chemical components each contains. They deliver antioxidants, too, but lots of natural ingredients also do this without exposing skin to irritating components.

What a shame; with some quick fixes this could be an outstanding intense hydrator for skin around the eyes.

Pros:
  • Exceptionally hydrating texture is ideal for dehydrated skin.
  • Very good mix of fatty acids and antioxidants.
  • Contains nourishing non-fragrant plant oils.
Cons:
  • Jar packaging hinders the effectiveness of the light- and air-sensitive ingredients.
  • Bitter orange and angelica pose a risk of irritating delicate skin around the eyes.
  • Contains more denatured alcohol (the bad kind) than many antioxidants.

More Info:

Jar Packaging & Anti-Aging Moisturizers: Beneficial anti-aging ingredients, which include all plant extracts, almost all vitamins, antioxidants, and other state-of-the-art ingredients, are unstable, which means they begin to break down in the presence of air. Once a jar is opened and lets air in, these important ingredients begin to deteriorate, becoming less and less effective. Routine exposure to daylight also is problematic for these ingredients.

Jar packaging is also unsanitary because you dip your fingers into the jar with each use, contaminating the product. This stresses the preservative system, leading to further deterioration of the beneficial ingredients.

Remember: The ingredients that provide the most benefit in addressing visible signs of aging must be in airtight or air-restrictive packaging to remain effective throughout usage. Buying products in this type of packaging means that the ingredients have the best chance of remaining effective—to the benefit of your skin!

References for this information:
Pharmacology Review, July 2013, pages 97–106
Dermatologic Therapy, May-June 2012, pages 252–259
Current Drug Delivery, November 2011, pages 640–660
Journal of Agricultural Food Chemistry, May 2011, pages 4676–4683
Journal of Biophotonics, January 2010, pages 82–88
Guidelines of Stability Testing of Cosmetic Products, Colipa-CTFA, March 2004, pages 1–10

 

Why You May Not Need an Eye Gel: There’s much you can do to address signs of aging around your eyes, but it’s not mandatory to use a product that claims to be special for the eye area. Any product loaded with antioxidants, emollients, skin-repairing and skin-brightening agents, and skin-soothing ingredients will also work well in the eye area. Those ingredients don’t have to come in a product labeled eye cream, eye gel, eye serum, or eye balm—they can be present in any well-formulated moisturizer or serum.

Most of the products designated as exclusively for the eye area are not really necessary because they contain nothing special for the eye area, they come in packaging that will not maintain the effectiveness of their key ingredients, and/or they are poorly formulated.

Just because a product is labeled as a special eye-area treatment does not mean it’s good for the eye area, or for any part of the face; in fact, many can make matters worse.

It’s staggering how many eye-area products lack even the most basic ingredients to help skin. For example, most eye-area products don’t contain sunscreen, which is a serious problem because it leaves skin around your eyes vulnerable to sun damage—and that absolutely will make dark circles, puffiness, and wrinkles worse! Of course, for nighttime use, eye-area products without sun protection are just fine. If you opt to apply an eye cream without sunscreen during the day, be sure to apply a sunscreen rated SPF 30 or greater over it.

Any product you use in the eye area must be well formulated and appropriate for the skin type around your eyes. You might prefer to use a product specially labeled as an eye cream, but you might do just as well by applying your regular facial moisturizer and/or serum around your eyes. Experiment to see what combination of products gives you the best results.

Jar Packaging: Yes
Tested on animals: Yes

Experience the pure and simple way to clinically proven 24-hour hydration and eye area-awakening results, with the power of Philosophy's Purity Made Simple Hydra-Bounce Eye Gel. Hydrate and revive tired-looking eyes with their unique cooling memory gel, featuring an eye area-awakening complex that includes ginkgo biloba extract and caffeine. Good-for-skin ingredients enrich the formula suitable for all skin types, with meadowfoam seed oil, cold-pressed chia seed oil, patented green tea antioxidant complex and potent forms of vitamins C & E and provitamin B5.

Aqua/Water/Eau, Glycerin, Caprylic/Capric Triglyceride, Butylene Glycol, PEG-240/Hdi Copolymer Bis-Decyltetradeceth-20 Ether, Limnanthes Alba (Meadowfoam) Seed Oil, Polyglyceryl-2 Diisostearate, Polysorbate 20, Butyrospermum Parkii (Shea) Butter Extract, Phenoxyethanol, Olea Europaea (Olive) Fruit Oil, Tocopheryl Acetate, Bisabolol, Cetearyl Olivate, Cyclopentasiloxane, Sorbitan Olivate, Caffeine, Panthenol, Propylene Glycol, Creatine, Dimethiconol, Salvia Hispanica Seed Oil, Acrylates/C10-30 Alkyl Acrylate Crosspolymer, PEG-8, Lecithin, Cyclohexasiloxane, Hydrogenated Lecithin, Ascorbyl Glucoside, BHT, Disodium EDTA, Ginkgo Biloba Leaf Extract, Sodium Hydroxide, Tocopherol, Aesculus Hippocastanum (Horse Chestnut) Seed Extract, Glucose, Lactic Acid, Chlorphenesin, Alcohol Denat., Ascorbyl Palmitate, Pantolactone, Potassium Sorbate, Camellia Sinensis Leaf Extract, Coffea Arabica (Coffee) Seed Extract, Pongamia Pinnata Seed Extract, Sorbic Acid, Citric Acid, Ascorbic Acid, Sodium Benzoate, Angelica Archangelica Root Extract, Citrus Aurantium Amara (Bitter Orange) Peel Extract, Maltodextrin, Polyglyceryl-3 Diisostearate, Magnesium Aluminum Silicate, Xanthan Gum, Farnesol, Caprylyl Glycol, Sclerotium Gum, FD&C Yellow No. 5 (Ci 19140).

philosophy At-A-Glance

Strengths: Relatively inexpensive;some of the best products are fragrance-free; very good retinol products; selection of state-of-the-art moisturizers; innovative skin-lightening product.

Weaknesses: Irritating and/or drying cleansers; average to problematic scrubs; at-home peel kits far more gimmicky than helpful; several products contain lavender oil; several products include irritating essential oils;the majority of makeup items do not rise above average status.

Believe in miracles. That's the "lifestyle" branding statement philosophy makes, which is an approach that is decidedly different from their former positioning, which encompassed family values and spirituality along with a dash of department-store lan and endearingly clever quips. The miracle angle may grab your attention, but the company is also quick to point out that its history is steeped in providing products to dermatologists and plastic surgeons worldwide (so, in addition to miracles, philosophy has a serious side, too). Although its heritage may have included providing clinically oriented products to doctors,we have yet to see or hear of any medical professional retailing philosophy products. And that's a good thing because, by and large, most of philosophy products are resounding disappointments. Moreover, several products, including almost all of their sunscreens, contain one or more known skin irritants. We would be extremely suspicious of a dermatologist or plastic surgeon who recommended such products to their patients, and even more so if they actually believed some of the more farfetched claims philosophy makes.

Interestingly, when you shop this line at department stores or at the cosmetics boutique Sephora, what you'll notice is the preponderance of food- and drink-scented bath products, all in vivid colors or cutely boxed for gift-giving. It seems that somewhere along the way, the company decided to promote these nose-appeal products while downplaying their more serious-minded, simply packaged skin care. Perhaps the body lotions and bubble baths have become philosophy's bread and butter. Given the hit-or-miss nature of their facial-care products, that's not surprising. Then again, they've also heavily promoted their anti-aging-themed Miracle Worker products...

So what's to like if you're into the vibe philosophy puts out? Well, this is still a line with some well-formulated staples, including an AHA product, some retinol options, and a handful of state-of-the-art moisturizers. The products that get the most promotion at the counter are the ones you should avoid, such as the at-home peels, scrubs, pads, and anti-acne products. However, the somewhat confusing, conflicting image philosophy presents shouldn't keep you from considering their best productsbut it's not a lifestyle brand in the sense that using the entire line will somehow bring you a more joyful existence, or significantly improved skin. The philosophy line is now ownedCoty, a cosmetics brand primarily known for their fragrances.Their acquisition ofphilosophy is their first major foray into a widely-distributed skin care brand.

For more information about philosophy, call (800) 568-3151 or visit www.philosophy.com.

Note: philosophy opts to use lowercase letters for every product they sell, so the listings below are simply following suit.

About the Experts

The Beautypedia team consists of skin care and makeup experts personally trained by the original Cosmetics Cop and best-selling beauty author, Paula Begoun. We’re fascinated by skin care and makeup products and thrilled when they meet or exceed our expectations, but we’re also disappointed when they fail to perform as claimed, are wildly overpriced, or contain ingredients scientific research has proven can hurt skin.

Our mission has always been to help you find the best products for your skin, no matter your budget or preferences. Beautypedia’s thorough and insightful reviews cut through the hype and provide reliable recommendations for all ages, skin types, and skin tones.

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