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philosophy

purity made simple deep-clean mask

4.00 fl. oz. for $ 25.00
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Ingredients

Brand Overview

First, mineral-rich or not, sea salts are not deep cleansing (how deep is "deep", anyway? No one can ever explain that to our satisfaction…) and they cannot detoxify skin. Skin isn't harboring toxins (read: poisons) that must be expunged; the body's detoxification organs include the liver and kidneys, but skin really doesn't play a role in this process, despite hundreds of products claiming differently. Besides, if all it took to deep clean and detox skin was sea salt, why bother with this mask? Chances are you have sea salt in your kitchen cupboard right now!

This scrub-like mask is really just salt in a glycerin base along with lesser amounts of cleansing agents and a lot of fragrance. Other than the glycerin (which keeps the sea salt from being too abrasive but you can still go overboard with this, potentially leading to reddened, irritated skin), this product contains shockingly little of value for anyone's skin, and is truly not worth considering.

Pros:
  • Leaves skin clean and smooth.
Cons:
  • Cannot deep clean or detoxify skin (skin doesn't need to be detoxed).
  • Contains a potentially irritating amount of fragrance plus fragrance ingredients like linalool and geraniol.
  • Overpriced for what amounts to a salt scrub for the face.
  • The promised "spa-like glow" can be achieved with any scrub or, better yet, an AHA or BHA leave-on exfoliant!
Jar Packaging: No
Tested on animals: Yes

purity made simple deep-clean mask transforms dull, tired skin and gives it a luminous, spa-like glow in just 60 seconds. fortified with mineral-rich, deep-cleansing sea salts to help naturally purify and detoxify while marine extracts and vitamin e help smooth the look of skin. See healthier, softer skin in just one use.

Glycerin, Aqua/Water/Eau, Polyglyceryl-10 Dipalmitate, Sea Salt, Phenoxyethanol, Caprylyl Glycol, Sodium Lauroamphoacetate, Sodium Trideceth Sulfate, Parfum/Fragrance, Linalool, Tocopheryl Acetate, Butylene Glycol, Panthenol, Isopropyl Alcohol, Geraniol, Algae Extract, Fucus Vesiculosus Extract, Macrocystis Pyrifera (Kelp) Extract, Plankton Extract, Citric Acid, FD&C Yellow No. 5 (Ci 19140).

philosophy At-A-Glance

Strengths: Relatively inexpensive;some of the best products are fragrance-free; very good retinol products; selection of state-of-the-art moisturizers; innovative skin-lightening product.

Weaknesses: Irritating and/or drying cleansers; average to problematic scrubs; at-home peel kits far more gimmicky than helpful; several products contain lavender oil; several products include irritating essential oils;the majority of makeup items do not rise above average status.

Believe in miracles. That's the "lifestyle" branding statement philosophy makes, which is an approach that is decidedly different from their former positioning, which encompassed family values and spirituality along with a dash of department-store lan and endearingly clever quips. The miracle angle may grab your attention, but the company is also quick to point out that its history is steeped in providing products to dermatologists and plastic surgeons worldwide (so, in addition to miracles, philosophy has a serious side, too). Although its heritage may have included providing clinically oriented products to doctors,we have yet to see or hear of any medical professional retailing philosophy products. And that's a good thing because, by and large, most of philosophy products are resounding disappointments. Moreover, several products, including almost all of their sunscreens, contain one or more known skin irritants. We would be extremely suspicious of a dermatologist or plastic surgeon who recommended such products to their patients, and even more so if they actually believed some of the more farfetched claims philosophy makes.

Interestingly, when you shop this line at department stores or at the cosmetics boutique Sephora, what you'll notice is the preponderance of food- and drink-scented bath products, all in vivid colors or cutely boxed for gift-giving. It seems that somewhere along the way, the company decided to promote these nose-appeal products while downplaying their more serious-minded, simply packaged skin care. Perhaps the body lotions and bubble baths have become philosophy's bread and butter. Given the hit-or-miss nature of their facial-care products, that's not surprising. Then again, they've also heavily promoted their anti-aging-themed Miracle Worker products...

So what's to like if you're into the vibe philosophy puts out? Well, this is still a line with some well-formulated staples, including an AHA product, some retinol options, and a handful of state-of-the-art moisturizers. The products that get the most promotion at the counter are the ones you should avoid, such as the at-home peels, scrubs, pads, and anti-acne products. However, the somewhat confusing, conflicting image philosophy presents shouldn't keep you from considering their best productsbut it's not a lifestyle brand in the sense that using the entire line will somehow bring you a more joyful existence, or significantly improved skin. The philosophy line is now ownedCoty, a cosmetics brand primarily known for their fragrances.Their acquisition ofphilosophy is their first major foray into a widely-distributed skin care brand.

For more information about philosophy, call (800) 568-3151 or visit www.philosophy.com.

Note: philosophy opts to use lowercase letters for every product they sell, so the listings below are simply following suit.

About the Experts

The Beautypedia team consists of skin care and makeup experts personally trained by the original Cosmetics Cop and best-selling beauty author, Paula Begoun. We’re fascinated by skin care and makeup products and thrilled when they meet or exceed our expectations, but we’re also disappointed when they fail to perform as claimed, are wildly overpriced, or contain ingredients scientific research has proven can hurt skin.

Our mission has always been to help you find the best products for your skin, no matter your budget or preferences. Beautypedia’s thorough and insightful reviews cut through the hype and provide reliable recommendations for all ages, skin types, and skin tones.

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