1

Elizabeth Arden

PREVAGE City Smart Detox Peel-Off Mask

2.50 fl. oz. for $ 78.00
Expert Rating

Expert Reviews

Community Reviews

Claims

Ingredients

Brand Overview

The PREVAGE City Smart Detox Peel-Off Mask is a problem right from the start because it contains two forms of irritating alcohol and makes misleading claims about detoxifying the skin. In short, it's a problem product for all skin types, not to mention overpriced!

Packaged in a squeeze tube, this mask contains both denatured alcohol and polyvinyl alcohol. The latter is what allows this mask to set to a smooth, plastic-like finish that you can peel off; however, it's also irritating and not the least bit on par with modern skincare science. See More Info to learn how alcohol harms skin.

As for the claim of instant and long-term detoxification, your skin doesn't have toxins (poisons) on its surface. Pollutants, yes, but Arden also mentions those as something their mask can remove, so they're making a distinction between a toxin and a pollutant. As we explain in the More Info section, skincare products cannot detoxify skin—it's a bogus claim. And keep this in mind: Washing your face is really all it takes to remove pollutants. A mask like this offers no extra benefits in that regard.

We love when a skincare product contains antioxidants and this mask has several of them along with some intriguing hydrating ingredients but that's where the positives stop and more insult to your skin begins again. Along with the alcohols mentioned above, your skin is also getting fragrance and synthetic coloring agents, neither of which are helpful. See our list of Best Face Masks for superior options, including several that are less expensive.

Pros:
  • Leaves skin smoother.
  • Contains several antioxidants.
Cons:
  • High amount of two types of skin-damaging alcohol.
  • The concept of a peel-off mask is dated.
  • Cannot detoxify skin.
  • Fragrance and synthetic coloring agents aren't skin-friendly ingredients.
More Info:

Alcohol-Based Skincare Products: Research makes it clear that alcohol, as a main ingredient in any skincare product, especially one you use frequently and repeatedly, is a problem.

When we express concern about the presence of alcohol in skincare or makeup products, we're referring to denatured ethanol, which most often is listed as SD alcohol, alcohol denat., denatured alcohol, or (less often) isopropyl alcohol.

When you see these types of alcohol listed among the first six ingredients on an ingredient label, without question the product will irritate and cause other problems for skin. There's no way around it—these volatile alcohols are simply bad for all skin types.

The reason they're included in products is because they provide a quick-drying finish, immediately degrease skin, and feel weightless, so it's easy to see their appeal, especially for those with oily skin. If only those short-term benefits didn't lead to negative long-term outcomes!

Using products that contain these alcohols will cause dryness, erosion of skin's protective barrier, and a strain on how skin replenishes, renews, and rejuvenates itself. Alcohol just weakens everything about skin.

The irony of using alcohol-based products to control oily skin is that the damage from the alcohol can actually lead to an increase in breakouts and enlarged pores. As we said, the alcohol does have an immediate de-greasing effect on skin, but it causes irritation, which eventually will counteract the de-greasing effect and make your oily skin look even more shiny.

There are people who challenge us on the information we've presented about alcohol's effects. They often base their argument on a study in the British Journal of Dermatology (July 2007, pages 74–81) that concluded "alcohol-based hand rubs cause less irritation than hand washing…." But, the only thing this study showed was that alcohol was not as irritating as an even more irritating hand wash, which contained sodium lauryl sulfate. So, the study is actually just telling you that one irritant, sodium lauryl sulfate, is worse than another irritant, alcohol.

Not all alcohols are bad. For example, there are fatty alcohols, which are absolutely non-irritating and can be beneficial for skin. Examples that you'll see on ingredient labels include cetyl alcohol, stearyl alcohol, and cetearyl alcohol, all of which are good ingredients for skin. It's important to differentiate between these skin-friendly alcohols and the problematic alcohols.

References for this information:

Chemical Immunology and Allergy, March 2012, pages 77–80

Aging, March 2012, pages 166–175

Journal of Occupational Medicine and Toxicology, November 2008, pages 1–16

Dermato-Endocrinology, January 2011, pages 41–49

Experimental Dermatology, June 2008, pages 542–551

Clinical Dermatology, September-October 2004, pages 360–366

Alcohol Journal, April 2002, pages 179–190

Why Beauty Products Cannot Detoxify Your Skin: Despite the claims of many cosmetics companies, you cannot "detox" your skin. Brands that make this claim never really specify exactly what substances or toxins their products are supposed to eliminate, which makes sense, because your skin does not store toxins.

Toxins are classified according to whether they are produced by the body or are introduced into the body, usually through eating or inhaling. Toxins are produced by plants, animals, insects, reptiles (think snake venom and bee stings), and so on. Toxins also can be inorganic, such as heavy metals like lead, arsenic, and others.

When it comes to your skin, toxins cannot leave your body through your skin or sebaceous (oil) glands—it's physiologically impossible. Other parts of your body, mainly your kidneys and liver, handle the process of "detoxifying" just fine, as long as you have a healthy diet.

There are a handful of studies indicating that sweat acts as a carrier in "detoxifying" by removing trace heavy metals from the body; however, the methodology of those studies is considered questionable when reviewed by third-party experts.

Nonetheless, if you choose to sauna, steam, or exercise to increase sweating, that's a lifestyle option to discuss with your physician, but it does absolutely nothing as a purifying skincare activity.

Skincare products are not going to "detox" your body or skin. As we always say: Stick to what the research says really works, and ignore the fantasy claims because they aren't going to help your skin or your budget!

References for this information:

Journal of Human Nutrition and Dietetics, December 2015, pages 675–686

Journal of Environmental and Public Health, 2012, pages 1–10

http://www.health.harvard.edu/staying-healthy/the-dubious-practice-of-detox

http://www.berkeleywellness.com/healthy-eating/diet-weight-loss/nutrition/article/truth-about-detox-diets

Jar Packaging: No
Tested on animals: Yes
Using powerful ingredients including antioxidants, a smart polymer and a botanical blend, PREVAGE City Smart Double Action Detox Peel Off Mask helps to perfect your complexion by removing accumulated surface toxins, peeling away dirt, oil and pollutants from the skin supporting skins natural detoxification system by gentle exfoliation. This smooth, gel formula delivers both immediate and long term detoxifying results
Water/Aqua/Eau, Polyvinyl Alcohol, Glycerin, Alcohol Denat., Butylene Glycol, Pentylene Glycol, Methyl Gluceth-10, Propanediol, Acrylates Copolymer, Aloe Barbadensis Leaf Extract, Aminomethyl Propanol, Bioflavonoids, Brassica Oleracea Italica (Broccoli) Extract, C12-15 Alkyl Benzoate, Caprylyl Glycol, Cetyl Palmitate, Dimethicone, Ergothioneine, Fomes Officinalis (Mushroom) Extract, Fructose, Glucose, Glucuronic Acid, Hydroxyacetophenone, Hydroxydecyl Ubiquinone, Lycium Chinensis Fruit Extract, Parfum/Fragrance, PEG-100 Stearate, PEG-40 Hydrogenated Castor Oil, PEG-40 Stearate, Silica, Sodium Laureth Sulfate, Sorbitan Stearate, Vaccinium Angustifolium (Blueberry) Fruit Extract, Vaccinium Macrocarpon (Cranberry) Fruit Extract, Xanthan Gum, Yeast Extract/Faex/Extrait De Levure, Chlorphenesin, Phenoxyethanol, Potassium Sorbate, Red 40 (CI 16035), Yellow 5 (CI 19140).

Elizabeth Arden At-A-Glance

Strengths: Some excellent serums and a few noteworthy moisturizers; praiseworthy concealers; a handful of well-formulated makeup products including foundation, blush, eyeshadow, and lipstick.

Weaknesses: No products for those battling blemishes; several products whose sunscreen lacks sufficient UVA protection; most of the foundations with sunscreen fail to provide sufficient UVA protection; lackluster eye and brow pencils; some problematic lip color products; jar packaging weakens some otherwise great formulas.

Former nurse Elizabeth Arden was a pioneer in the beauty industry. At the turn of the 20th century, Arden began her legacy when she opened her first salon, with the now-familiar red door. Over the next several years she introduced new products and services to women unaccustomed to such choices, and almost single-handedly made it acceptable for modern women to wear makeup. And while Arden understood and met these beauty needs, she was also adept at self-promotion and packaging, helping to solidify the idea that what holds the product should be as beautiful as the woman who uses it. She was the front-runner in the cosmetics industry for quite some time, until another young go-getter by the name of Estee Lauder began her own empireone that would eventually lead to the Elizabeth Arden line being almost an afterthought in the mind of many consumers.

Not only has Arden's image been diminished over the years due to odd distribution patterns (consumers were getting mixed messages as this prestige line began showing up in drug and discount chain stores), but also through their own formulary mistakes and seeming unwillingness to pay attention to current research. Given the history of this line and several outstanding products they've produced in the past, it's very frustrating that what's offered today is such a mishmash of good and bad, with a hefty dose of average. Arden still has several sunscreens that fall short by leaving out sufficient UVA protection. In contrast, Estee Lauder and the Lauder-owned lines have their sunscreen acts together and consistently impress by including other state-of-the-art goodies to amplify the environmental protection of their moisturizers.

Many of Arden's products also contain potentially problematic ingredients or are packaged in a way that puts the light- and air-sensitive ingredients at risk of breaking down shortly after the product is opened. Given Elizabeth Arden's (the woman) pioneering, innovative spirit,we can't imagine her being completely pleased with the state of her namesake skin-care line (Arden passed away in 1966). Having the gorgeous Catherine Zeta-Jones as a spokesmodel for most of theearly 2000smay have raised more interest in this brand than in years past, but a pretty face and eye-catching ads don't always translate to good skin care, as evidenced by the reviews on this site. There are some very impressive products in this line, but it's definitely one that demands careful attention to what you're buying lest you put your skin at risk.

For more information about Elizabeth Arden, call (800) 326-7337 or visit www.elizabetharden.com.

Elizabeth Arden Makeup

Cosmetics trailblazer Elizabeth Arden may have been single-handedly responsible for bringing modern makeup to American women (she opened the famous Red Door Salon in 1910 and formulated the first blush and tinted powders in 1912), but today's lineup of Arden makeup has far more disappointments than its pioneering namesake would have liked.Most of the Arden foundations with sunscreen either leave out the five prime UVA-screening active ingredients or because their SPF numbers are unnecessarily low. Either way,only oneof the foundations with sunscreens can be relied on as your sole source of facial sun protection.

In contrast to the mostlydisappointing foundations, you'll be pleased with what Arden offers for concealer, eyeshadow, lipstick, and mascara. Each of these categories has some brilliant products to consider, and they serve to prove, at least to a modest extent, that Elizabeth Arden makeup is not to be counted out just yet. The remaining products have little to extol, either because they are truly ineffective or because the competition has Arden beat by a mile.A continual bright spot for Arden is that their tester units are typically well organized and the colors are grouped so it's easy to zero in on what you like.

About the Experts

The Beautypedia team consists of skin care and makeup experts personally trained by the original Cosmetics Cop and best-selling beauty author, Paula Begoun. We’re fascinated by skin care and makeup products and thrilled when they meet or exceed our expectations, but we’re also disappointed when they fail to perform as claimed, are wildly overpriced, or contain ingredients scientific research has proven can hurt skin.

Our mission has always been to help you find the best products for your skin, no matter your budget or preferences. Beautypedia’s thorough and insightful reviews cut through the hype and provide reliable recommendations for all ages, skin types, and skin tones.