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Dr. Hauschka

Normalizing Day Oil, for Oily, Blemished and Mature Skin

1.00 fl. oz. for $ 42.95
Expert Rating

Expert Reviews

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Claims

Ingredients

Brand Overview

Normalizing Day Oil, for Oily, Blemished and Mature Skin contains mostly goldenrod extract, plant oils, plant extracts, and fragrance. You can find plant oils like this in your kitchen cabinet (almond, wheat germ, and jojoba) and they are just fine for dry skin. What is strange is that this product is recommended for blemished skin and for those with enlarged pores. Those with oily skin or blemishes don't need more oil, and not a single ingredient in this product is capable of reducing oil production, reducing pore size, or healing blemishes; in fact, the potential irritation from the fragrance ingredients can trigger more oil production, which we bet isn't what you had in mind!

Jar Packaging: No
Tested on animals: No

A daily treatment for oily or blemished skin. This lightweight, fast-penetrating oil helps balance oil production, heal blemishes and reduce redness and sensitivity.

Anthyllis Vulneraria Extract, Prunus Armeniaca (Apricot) Kernel Oil, Prunus Amygdalus Dulcis (Sweet Almond) Oil, Arachis Hypogaea (Peanut) Oil, Daucus Carota Sativa (Carrot) Root Extract, Hypericum Perforatum Flower/Leaf/Stem Extract, Helianthus Annuus (Sunflower) Seed Oil, Calendula Officinalis Flower Extract, Triticum Vulgare (Wheat) Germ Oil, Melia Azadirachta Leaf Extract, Simmondsia Chinensis (Jojoba) Seed Oil, Triticum Vulgare (Wheat) Bran Extract, Fragrance (Parfum), Linalool, Citronellol, Citral, Geraniol, Farnesol, Benzyl Benzoate, Limonene, Eugenol, Benzyl Salicylate, Theobroma Cacao (Cocoa) Seed Butter

Dr. Hauschka At-A-Glance

Strengths: None for skin care; one good lipstick.

Weaknesses: Every skin-care product contains at least one volatile fragrance component or plant ingredient that can be irritating to skin as well as causing increased sensitivity when skin is exposed to sunlight;no sunscreens;the moisturizers are mostly redundant and easily replaced by plain, non-fragrant oils; no products to address even the most basic skin-care concerns; several hokey products with absolutely zero research attesting to their effectiveness.

Dr. Rudolf Hauschka is no longer around, although the Germany-based cosmetics company bearing his name definitely is. Sold primarily at health food stores, the products are a standout for their high prices alone.

If plants are your thing, these formulations, according to the ingredient lists, are some of the most "pure" there are. However, the formulas are a frustrating mix of good and bad natural ingredients, and there are no suitable options for those with oily, combination, or sensitive skin (especially for sensitive skin, as everything, and we mean every product, in this line contains fragrance).

As for the products themselves, despite the inclusion of lots of natural ingredients sure to pique consumer interest, Dr. Hauschka's development team seemingly ignored copious research on skin-care ingredients from the last 20 years or so. For example, almost every product has plant extracts that have irritation potential, and most of the problematic ones have no known benefit for skin, so you're risking irritation without a reward. Instead, the company literature goes on and on about how the products are rhythmically mixed and the spiritual connection between nature and people. It all sounds tempting and quite Zen until you realize such back-to-nature philosophies aren't necessarily the key to a healthy complexion. We have little doubt that most consumers using these products will experience some amount of skin irritation, and the textures of many items are inelegant at best; "silky" is s not a word that comes mind!

We're skeptical about the disclosure of the ingredients in the products because preservatives are not listed. If that is truly the case, the risk of contamination after just a couple of weeks of use is significant, especially considering how many plant extracts these products contain. The company insists that the ingredient lists are accurate and that the natural extracts and essential oils chosen have self-preserving propertiesbut cosmeti chemistry research doesn't support this; such ingredients don't have the same preservation track records as those (such as the parabens and phenoxyethanol) that show up in thousands of other products.

From a modern, research-supported perspective, this is one of the most ineffective, potentially irritating lines around and a classic example of why natural isn't automatically the best way to go for intelligent skin care. The moisturizers have their share of helpful ingredients for dry skin, but are about as state-of-the-art as a console television.

In early 2009 the company announced that they discontinued all of their sunscreens. This decision was in response to new European Union regulations governing labeling for products with UVA-protecting ingredients. Dr. Hauschka will not formulate a sunscreen with synthetic active ingredients, and from everything we've read and from all of the discussions we've had with cosmetic chemists about this issue, there is no way a sunscreen can meet the EU's new UVA standards without including asynthetic active.

For more information about Dr. Hauschka, call (800) 247-9907 or visit www.drhauschka.com.

Dr. Hauschka Makeup

Termed Decorative Cosmetics, the collection doesn't much reason to give this makeup more than a passing glance, as the products are downright ordinary to inadequate, and the prices should snap even the most meditative soul back to reality. Sadly, every color cosmetic product from this brand, even those meant for use around the eyes, contains one or more problematic fragrance ingredients.

About the Experts

The Beautypedia team consists of skin care and makeup experts personally trained by the original Cosmetics Cop and best-selling beauty author, Paula Begoun. We’re fascinated by skin care and makeup products and thrilled when they meet or exceed our expectations, but we’re also disappointed when they fail to perform as claimed, are wildly overpriced, or contain ingredients scientific research has proven can hurt skin.

Our mission has always been to help you find the best products for your skin, no matter your budget or preferences. Beautypedia’s thorough and insightful reviews cut through the hype and provide reliable recommendations for all ages, skin types, and skin tones.

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