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Vichy

Normaderm Total Mat Anti-Shine Mattifier

1.01 fl. oz. for $ 24.50
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Ingredients

Brand Overview

This mattifier helps keep excess shine in check, but the formula contains enough alcohol to put oily skin at risk of irritation—which ends up making it worse rather than helping it stay shine-free. The lingering fragrance this contains doesn't make it any less irritating, either!

Although medicated with 0.5% salicylic acid, this formula's pH is too high for the salicylic acid to function as an exfoliant. So, you're left with a product that temporarily tamps oily shine, but cannot exfoliate or clear clogged pores, and is likely to make oily skin more, not less, of a problem. Are you beginning to think this ends up being a bum deal for your skin? We agree!

Pros:
  • Super-light formula sets to an absorbent matte finish.
Cons:
  • Product's pH is too low for the salicylic acid to exfoliate and improve clogged pores.
  • Amount of alcohol puts oily skin at risk of irritation and possible becoming more oily.
  • Lingering fragrance can promote further irritation.
More Info:

Applying irritating ingredients to oily skin stimulates excess oil production at the base of the pores, so skin ends up being more oily and pores become (or stay) enlarged. If you want to see improvements in oily skin, the best approach is to treat your skin gently with effective products designed to absorb excess oil, exfoliate inside the pore, and help normalize pore function (Sources: Clinical Dermatology, September-October 2004, pages 360–366; and Dermatology, January 2003, pages 17–23).

Jar Packaging: No
Tested on animals: Yes

Anti-shine mattifier with "blotting paper effect," clinically tested, intense mattifying efficacy to provide an all day clean skin feeling.

Active: Salicylic Acid .5%. Inactive: Water, Dimethicone, Alcohol Denat., Glycerin, Propylene Glycol, Lauryl Methacrylate/Glycol Dimethacrylate Crosspolymer, Perlite, Nylon-66, PEG-12 Dimethicone, Dimethicone/Vinyl Dimethicone Crosspolymer, Sodium Polyacrylate, Sodium Hydroxide, Phenoxyethanol, Ammonium Polyacryloyldimethyl Taurate, Caprylyl Glycol, Biosaccharide Gum-1, Fragrance.

Vichy At-A-Glance

Vichy's products, though well-intentioned, are incapable of addressing several common problems. About all you can expect from most Vichy moisturizers is relief from dryness. That's it. Every product's claims "talk the talk," but they cannot possibly walk the walk because what's in them is, for the most part, standard, and without any research behind it to show that it makes a difference.

A big-deal ingredient for Vichy is their Thermal Spa Water. It is said to reduce irritation, strengthen skin's natural defenses, and provide free radicalquelling activity thanks to its trace minerals and salt. There is no substantiated proof to support these claims, save for a somewhat primitive chart Vichy provides to show this water helps reduce cutaneous signs of irritation (what it was compared to, if anything, is unknown). Two other L'Oreal-owned brands, Biotherm and La Roche-Posay, have similar special waters, each claiming to be mineral-rich. Yet if these are so unique and wonderfully beneficial for everyone's skin, why don't all L'Oreal-owned lines such as Lancome, L'Oreal, Kiehls, SkinCeuticals, and The Body Shop, use them, too?

As expected, there are some bona fide winners among Vichy's products, but using Vichy exclusively with the expectation that their products have the answer to whatever your skin needs to have fixed is like thinking green tea is the only food your body needs.

Note: Vichy is categorized as a brand that tests on animals because its products are sold in China. Although Vichy does not conduct animal testing for its products sold elsewhere, the Chinese government requires imported cosmetics be tested on animals, so foreign companies retailing there must comply. This requirement is why some brands state that they dont test on animals unless required by law. Animal rights organizations consider cosmetic companies retailed in China to be brands that test on animals, and so does the Beautypedia Research Team.

For more information about Vichy, owned by L'Oreal, visit www.vichy.com.

About the Experts

The Beautypedia team consists of skin care and makeup experts personally trained by the original Cosmetics Cop and best-selling beauty author, Paula Begoun. We’re fascinated by skin care and makeup products and thrilled when they meet or exceed our expectations, but we’re also disappointed when they fail to perform as claimed, are wildly overpriced, or contain ingredients scientific research has proven can hurt skin.

Our mission has always been to help you find the best products for your skin, no matter your budget or preferences. Beautypedia’s thorough and insightful reviews cut through the hype and provide reliable recommendations for all ages, skin types, and skin tones.

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