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Clean & Clear

Night Relaxing Detox Clay Mask

1.70 fl. oz. for $ 6.49
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Brand Overview

Night Relaxing Detox Clay Mask is so highly fragranced that there's no possible way we can recommend putting it on your face. Not only that, but the detox claims are bogus.

While this clay mask may help absorb oil temporarily, the irritation that it incites via fragrance can actually trigger more oil production in the long run (see More Info). It also starts to feel uncomfortably drying as the mask sets over the course of the 15 minutes that you're supposed to leave it on.

It's true that the clays in this formula can help dislodge debris from congested pores, but that's not the same thing as "detoxing" skin—see More Info to learn why the latter is impossible.

The bottom line: This pastel green mask may look cute in a selfie and seem relaxing, but what it's doing to your skin under the surface is anything but good.

Pros:
  • Clay mask initially feels refreshing.
Cons:
  • Strongly fragranced formula poses risk of irritating skin and making oiliness worse.
  • Starts to feel drying as soon as it sets.
  • Cannot detox skin as claimed.
More Info:

Why beauty products cannot detoxify your skin: Despite the claims of many cosmetics companies, you cannot "detox" your skin. Brands that make this claim never really specify exactly what substances or toxins their products are supposed to eliminate, which makes sense, because your skin does not store toxins.

Toxins are classified according to whether they are produced by the body or are introduced into the body, usually through eating or inhaling. Toxins are produced by plants, animals, insects, reptiles (think snake venom and bee stings), and so on. Toxins also can be inorganic, such as heavy metals like lead, arsenic, and others.

When it comes to your skin, toxins cannot leave your body through your skin or sebaceous (oil) glands—it's physiologically impossible. Other parts of your body, mainly your kidneys and liver, handle the process of "detoxifying" just fine, as long as you have a healthy diet.

There are a handful of studies indicating that sweat acts as a carrier in "detoxifying" by removing trace heavy metals from the body; however, the methodology of those studies is considered questionable when reviewed by third-party experts.

Nonetheless, if you choose to sauna, steam, or exercise to increase sweating, that's a lifestyle option to discuss with your physician, but it does absolutely nothing as a purifying skincare activity.

Skincare products are not going to "detox" your body or skin. As we always say: Stick to what the research says really works, and ignore the fantasy claims because they aren't going to help your skin or your budget!

References for this information:

Journal of Human Nutrition and Dietetics, December 2015, pages 675–686

Journal of Environmental and Public Health, 2012, pages 1–10

https://www.health.harvard.edu/staying-healthy/the-dubious-practice-of-detox

https://www.berkeleywellness.com/healthy-eating/diet-weight-loss/nutrition/article/truth-about-detox-diets

Not being gentle to skin can increase oily skin & breakouts: Using irritating ingredients (such as fragrance) is a serious problem for all skin types, especially for those with oily, combination, and acne-prone skin.

Research has clearly established that when skin is irritated, the oil gland at the base of each pore is stimulated to make more oil, creating a perfect environment for breakouts, white bumps, and clogged pores to get worse.

Using a product that is gentle and completely non-irritating is without question the only approach to taking the best care of your skin; doing otherwise hurts your skin—this is true even if you cannot see or feel the damage taking place.

It is also vitally important to use products that research has shown are beneficial for oily skin, clogged pores, and breakouts. The gold standard over-the-counter ingredients for these concerns are salicylic acid (BHA) and benzoyl peroxide.

References for this information:

Journal of Clinical Aesthetic Dermatology, January 2016, pages 25–30

Journal of European Dermatology and Venerology, May 2014, pages 527–532

Journal of Dermatology, May 2012, pages 433–438

Clinical, Cosmetic, and Investigational Dermatology, April 2011, pages 41–53

Dermato-Endocrinology, January-March 2011, pages 41–49

Experimental Dermatology, October 2009, pages 821–832

Journal of the American Medical Association, August 2004, page 764

Dermatology, January 2003, pages 17–23

European Journal of Dermatology, September-October 2002, pages 422–427

Jar Packaging: Yes
Tested on animals: Yes
CLEAN & CLEAR NIGHT RELAXING Detox Clay Mask detoxifies deep down to the pores to remove dirt, oil, and impurities from the day. Using the power of two mineral clays, bentonite and kaolin, with a relaxing fragrance, this specially designed formula gives your skin a detox before bed. Easy-to-use, this clay mask is gentle on skin and leaves skin feeling soft and healthy.
Water, Kaolin, Bentonite, Glycerin, Palmitic Acid, Glyceryl Stearate SE, 1, 2-Hexanediol, Stearic Acid, Cetearyl Alcohol, Caprylic/Capric Triglyceride, Magnesium Aluminum Silicate, Phenoxyethanol, Caprylyl Glycol, Xanthan Gum, Fragrance, Ethylhexylglycerin, Tromethamine, Disodium EDTA, Butyrospermum Parkii (Shea) Butter, Sucrose Cocoate, Chondrus Crispus Extract, Moringa Oleifera Seed Extract, Citric Acid, Titanium Dioxide, Ultramarines, Chromium Oxide Greens.

Clean & Clear At-A-Glance

Strengths: Inexpensive; an excellent 10% benzoyl peroxide product; some very good cleansers.

Weaknesses: The majority of products contain irritating fragrant extracts, alcohol, menthol, menthyl lactate, or other problematic ingredients; below-average moisturizers; poor options for those struggling with breakouts or blackheads (at least if your goal is assembling a helpful skin-care routine using only Clean & Clear's products).

The name of this Johnson & Johnsonowned brand clearly communicates what it attempts to provide, and may seem to be a beacon of hope for consumers struggling with acne. The products are heavily marketed toward teens, with commercials and print ads featuring attractive young models with nary a blemish in sight, presumably because these fresh-faced teens adhere to a routine consisting of these attractively packaged products.

Although there are some great, inexpensive cleansers available, blemishes have nothing to do with how clean your skin is; the two issues are completely unrelated. The other failing is that unlike sister company Neutrogena (also owned by J&J), almost all of Clean & Clear's anti-acne products contain irritating ingredients that won't improve skin problems and end up making matters worse. Even a couple of the pH-correct BHA options are marred by troublesome ingredients that only make blemished skin more inflamed and impede the healing process. Moreover, the issue of sun protection is inadequately addressed, with the only option failing to provide sun protection without added irritants. What kind of message is that for teens trying to put together an effective skin-care routine? Clean skin is attainable from these products, but the company's road to "beautifully clear" skin has too many speed bumps to make this a one-stop destination for the blemish-prone.

For more information about Clean & Clear, call (877) 754-6411 or visit www.cleanandclear.com.

About the Experts

The Beautypedia team consists of skin care and makeup experts personally trained by the original Cosmetics Cop and best-selling beauty author, Paula Begoun. We’re fascinated by skin care and makeup products and thrilled when they meet or exceed our expectations, but we’re also disappointed when they fail to perform as claimed, are wildly overpriced, or contain ingredients scientific research has proven can hurt skin.

Our mission has always been to help you find the best products for your skin, no matter your budget or preferences. Beautypedia’s thorough and insightful reviews cut through the hype and provide reliable recommendations for all ages, skin types, and skin tones.