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Benefit

Moisture Prep Toning Lotion

6.00 fl. oz. for $ 30.00
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Brand Overview

This overpriced toner is absolutely not worth considering, even if you have money to burn. It is over-fragranced and the third ingredient is alcohol, which causes dryness, free-radical damage, and irritation that hurts healthy collagen production. Granted, the amount of alcohol is likely low enough to pose minimal risk, but why take chances when there are great toners that completely omit irritants?

Another disappointing aspect of this toner is that the majority of the most helpful ingredients are present in teeny-tiny amounts so they’re of little use for your skin. In terms of the claims, all they're really stating is what a well formulated toner can do, yet the irony is Benefit is not offering a well formulated toner that can make good on these claims!

Jar Packaging: No
Tested on animals: Yes

The special step for extra radiant skin. Smooths and revitalizes, allowing skin to fully optimize benefits of your moisturizer.

Water, Glycerin, Alcohol, Butylene Glycol, PEG-60 Hydrogenated Casotr Oil, Phenoxyethanol, PEG-150, Avena Sativa (Oat) Kernel Extract, Fragrance (Parfum), Tromethamine, Carbomer, Acrylates/C10-30 Alkyl Acrylate Crosspolymer, Disodium EDTA, Tetrasodium EDTA, Tocopheryl Acetate, Styrene/Acrylates Copolymer, Spiraea Ulmara Extract, Artemsia Capillaris Flower Extract, Linalool, Biosaccharide Gum-1, Benzophenone-4, Sodium Hyaluronate, Hexyl Cinnamal, Limonene, Sodium Lauryl Sulfate, BHT.

Benefit At-A-Glance

Benefit was developed by twins Jean Danielson and Jane Blackford, whose initial claim to fame was a stint as the Calgon twins back in 1960s television commercials. They opened their first cosmetics store, The Face Place, in San Francisco, circa 1976, and then, perhaps recognizing the need for a name with more impact, The Face Place became Benefit in 1990. From there the line took off and expanded its presence beyond the Bay Area to include national department stores and, eventually, Sephora boutiques.

Benefit's makeup philosophy is outrageously fun and its product arsenal is centered on impossibly cute names and a lexicon that aims to make beauty enjoyable. Benefit single-handedly started the trend of selling makeup and skincare products with ultra-cute appellations for less than ultra-fancy prices. As with most lines, there are enough missteps and problem products to shop carefully, but Benefit shines in several categories, including foundation, bronzing powder, blush, and shimmer products.

Unfortunately, some of the products simply can't live up to their promises. This is mostly true of their skincare formulas, where the showcased ingredients are either present in itsy-bitsy amounts or the claims attributed to them are very exaggerated. Despite this, if you're in the mood for a fun experience and can manage to choose products wisely while enjoying the whimsy, Benefit deserves a look.

For more information about Benefit, visit www.Benefitcosmetics.com.

About the Experts

The Beautypedia team consists of skin care and makeup experts personally trained by the original Cosmetics Cop and best-selling beauty author, Paula Begoun. We’re fascinated by skin care and makeup products and thrilled when they meet or exceed our expectations, but we’re also disappointed when they fail to perform as claimed, are wildly overpriced, or contain ingredients scientific research has proven can hurt skin.

Our mission has always been to help you find the best products for your skin, no matter your budget or preferences. Beautypedia’s thorough and insightful reviews cut through the hype and provide reliable recommendations for all ages, skin types, and skin tones.

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