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Fourth Ray Beauty

Later Hater Spot Treatment

1.00 fl. oz. for $ 12.00
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Fourth Ray Beauty’s blemish-fighting product might be called Later Hater Spot Treatment, but the truth is there’s really nothing to like about this product at all.

Later Hater Spot Treatment relies on the outdated notion that you can dry up acne, but that’s simply not how treating or preventing acne works (it’s a lot more complicated than that) and drying out skin causes numerous problems.

This fluid comes in a frosted glass bottle and is initially separated into a clear and pink layer that mix together once shaken. The pink color comes from calamine, long used to treat itching from insect bites, poison ivy and oak, but is not a good option for blemishes because it can sensitize skin. Bug bites and poison ivy are temporary issues, while acne often hangs around for years.

Also in this liquid are an alarmingly high amount of skin-drying alcohol (it’s the first ingredient), plus sulfur and camphor. When alcohol dries skin out, it leads to an increase in oil production, thus potentially more breakouts (see More Info for details). Sulfur and camphor are very drying irritants that can also cause skin to react by breaking out more. Yikes! This is just about the last product oily, acne-prone skin needs.

It’s best to say “see you later” to Later Hater Spot Treatment. For acne-fighting products with real results that won’t damage skin, seek out gentler formulas containing gold star anti-acne ingredients like benzoyl peroxide and salicylic acid.

Pros:
  • None.
Cons:
  • Contains a high amount of drying alcohol.
  • Contains calamine, sulfur, and camphor, all of which can irritate skin.

Alcohol-Based Skincare Products: Research makes it clear that alcohol, as a main ingredient in any skincare product, especially one you use frequently and repeatedly, is a problem.

When we express concern about the presence of alcohol in skincare or makeup products, we’re referring to denatured ethanol, which most often is listed as SD alcohol, alcohol denat., denatured alcohol, or (less often) isopropyl alcohol.

When you see these types of alcohol listed among the first six ingredients on an ingredient label, without question the product will irritate and cause other problems for skin. There’s no way around it—these volatile alcohols are simply bad for all skin types.

The reason they’re included in products is because they provide a quick-drying finish, immediately degrease skin, and feel weightless, so it’s easy to see their appeal, especially for those with oily skin. If only those short-term benefits didn’t lead to negative long-term outcomes!

Using products that contain these alcohols will cause dryness, erosion of skin’s protective barrier, and a strain on how skin replenishes, renews, and rejuvenates itself. Alcohol just weakens everything about skin.

The irony of using alcohol-based products to control oily skin is that the damage from the alcohol can actually lead to an increase in breakouts and enlarged pores. As we said, the alcohol does have an immediate de-greasing effect on skin, but it causes irritation, which eventually will counteract the de-greasing effect and make your oily skin look even more shiny.

There are people who challenge us on the information we’ve presented about alcohol’s effects. They often base their argument on a study in the British Journal of Dermatology (July 2007, pages 74–81) that concluded “alcohol-based hand rubs cause less irritation than hand washing….” But, the only thing this study showed was that alcohol was not as irritating as an even more irritating hand wash, which contained sodium lauryl sulfate. So, the study is actually just telling you that one irritant, sodium lauryl sulfate, is worse than another irritant, alcohol.

Not all alcohols are bad. For example, there are fatty alcohols, which are absolutely non-irritating and can be beneficial for skin. Examples that you’ll see on ingredient labels include cetyl alcoholstearyl alcohol, and cetearyl alcohol, all of which are good ingredients for skin. It’s important to differentiate between these skin-friendly alcohols and the problematic alcohols.

References for this information:

Chemical Immunology and Allergy, March 2012, pages 77–80

Aging, March 2012, pages 166–175

Journal of Occupational Medicine and Toxicology, November 2008, pages 1–16

Dermato-Endocrinology, January 2011, pages 41–49

Experimental Dermatology, June 2008, pages 542–551

Clinical Dermatology, September-October 2004, pages 360–366

Alcohol Journal, April 2002, pages 179–190

Irritating Ingredients: We cannot stress this enough: Sensitizing, harsh, abrasive, and/or fragrant ingredients are bad for all skin types. Daily application of skincare products that contain these irritating ingredients is a major way we unwittingly do our skin a disservice!

Irritating ingredients are a problem because they can lead to visible problems, such as redness, rough skin, dull skin, dryness, increased oil production, and clogged pores, and they contribute to making signs of aging worse.

Switching to non-irritating, gentle skincare products can make all the difference in the world. Non-irritating products are those packed with beneficial ingredients that also replenish and soothe skin, without any volatile ingredients, such as those present in fragrance ingredients, whether natural or synthetic.

A surprising fact: Research has demonstrated that you do not need to see or feel the effects of irritants on your skin for your skin to be suffering, and visible damage may not become apparent for a long time. Don’t get lulled into thinking that if you don’t see or feel signs of irritation, everything is OK.

Generally, it’s best to eliminate, or minimize as much as possible, your exposure to ingredients that are known to irritate skin. There are many completely non-irritating products that contain effective ingredients, so there’s no reason to put your skin at risk with products that include ingredients research has shown can be a problem.

References for this information:

Journal of Dermatological Sciences, January 2015, pages 28–36

International Journal of Cosmetic Science, August 2014, pages 379–385

Clinical Dermatology, May-June 2012, pages 257–262

Aging, March 2012, pages 166–175

Chemical Immunology and Allergy, March 2012, pages 77–80

Skin Pharmacology and Physiology, June 2008, pages 124–135

Food and Chemical Toxicology, February 2008, pages 446–475

American Journal of Clinical Dermatology, 2003, pages 789–798

Jar Packaging: No
Tested on animals: No

An overnight spot treatment formulated with soothing ingredients to help reduce breakouts. This two-phase pink solution targets spots with a highly effective blend of Salicylic Acid, Sulfur, and Calamine. Later Hater provides relief without leaving your skin itchy, flaky or irritated. Apply directly onto spots before bedtime to help dry up impurities while you sleep.

Isopropyl Alcohol, Water, Calamine, Talc, Sulfur, Zinc Oxide, Glycerin, Camphor, Salicylic Acid, Quartz, Titanium Dioxide (CI 77891).

With as much focus on the metaphysical as on the scientific, Fourth Ray Beauty is the brainchild of Seed Beauty, the creator of social-media savvy lines like Kylie Cosmetics and ColourPop. The brand says its focus is on wellness-inspired skin care, and that the name Fourth Ray is derived from the fourth ray of the rainbow, which represents “beauty, harmony, purity, wholeness, and integration.”

Its lineup consists of mainly the basics when it comes to a skin care routine: cleanser, toner, moisturizer, and acne treatment. The formulas are largely unremarkable, with a lack of impressive ingredients, and most of its products contain fragrance. The standout is their cleansing oil which bypasses most of the pitfalls of its competition.

When it comes to its approach to acne and oily skin though, this brand with a New Age philosophy has a decidedly old-school approach by including witch hazel, alcohol, and other irritants that can make acne and oily skin worse.

Fourth Ray infuses each of its products with crystals to, as stated on its website, “cleanse not just your skin but your energy.” This is just marketing, though; there’s no scientific research proving that crystals can do anything for skin.

You can learn more about Fourth Ray Beauty on its website, fourthraybeauty.com.

About the Experts

The Beautypedia team consists of skin care and makeup experts personally trained by the original Cosmetics Cop and best-selling beauty author, Paula Begoun. We’re fascinated by skin care and makeup products and thrilled when they meet or exceed our expectations, but we’re also disappointed when they fail to perform as claimed, are wildly overpriced, or contain ingredients scientific research has proven can hurt skin.

Our mission has always been to help you find the best products for your skin, no matter your budget or preferences. Beautypedia’s thorough and insightful reviews cut through the hype and provide reliable recommendations for all ages, skin types, and skin tones.