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Dr. Dennis Gross Skincare

Hyaluronic Marine Dew It All Eye Gel

0.50 fl. oz. for $ 48.00
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Brand Overview

Dr. Dennis Gross Skincare's Hyaluronic Marine Dew it All Eye Gel doesn't do it all but does continue the impressive streak this brand has when it comes to fragrance-free eye treatments that aren't packaged in jars.

Housed in an opaque cylindrical component with a matching cap, this cream-gel is dispensed via a built-in pump. It contains lightweight hydrating and smoothing ingredients along with several plant-derived antioxidants and anti-irritants that can help reduce some types of puffiness. We wrote "some types" because no eye-area product can reduce age-related puffiness that occurs when fat pads beneath the eyes have shifted out of place.

We appreciate this product's use of newer, intriguing ingredients like Caulerpa lentillifera, a type of green algae that has anti-inflammatory benefits and another plant anti-inflammatory, Smilax aristolochiifolia. Neither of them has research directly related to undereye puffiness, but their theoretical benefit is promising—and this eye gel does contain some proven ingredients to de-puff.

As for dark circles, you'll see some improvement from the mineral pigments that brighten shadowed areas, but that's a cosmetic effect. The licorice root might have some impact on dark circles made worse from sun damage (meaning excess melanin is part of what's making the circles more pronounced) but this won't help with genetic dark circles.

Pros:
  • Delicate cream-gel texture is loaded with beneficial ingredients.
  • Hydrates and smooths fine lines without a greasy look or feel.
  • Visibly brightens the undereye area.
  • Fragrance free.
Cons:
  • Overstated claims around puffiness and dark circles, but some types of both concerns might see improvement.
More Info:

Why You May Not Need an Eye Gel: There's much you can do to address signs of aging around your eyes, but it's not mandatory to use a product that claims to be special for the eye area. Any product loaded with antioxidants, emollients, skin-repairing and skin-brightening agents, and skin-soothing ingredients will also work well in the eye area. Those ingredients don't have to come in a product labeled eye cream, eye gel, eye serum, or eye balm—they can be present in any well-formulated moisturizer or serum.

Most of the products designated as exclusively for the eye area are not really necessary because they contain nothing special for the eye area, they come in packaging that will not maintain the effectiveness of their key ingredients, and/or they are poorly formulated.

Just because a product is labeled as a special eye-area treatment does not mean it's good for the eye area, or for any part of the face; in fact, many can make matters worse.

It's staggering how many eye-area products lack even the most basic ingredients to help skin. For example, most eye-area products don't contain sunscreen, which is a serious problem because it leaves skin around your eyes vulnerable to sun damage—and that absolutely will make dark circles, puffiness, and wrinkles worse! Of course, for nighttime use, eye-area products without sun protection are just fine. If you opt to apply an eye cream without sunscreen during the day, be sure to apply a sunscreen rated SPF 30 or greater over it.

Any product you use in the eye area must be well formulated and appropriate for the skin type around your eyes. You might prefer to use a product specially labeled as an eye cream, but you might do just as well by applying your regular facial moisturizer and/or serum around your eyes. Experiment to see what combination of products gives you the best results.

Jar Packaging: No
Tested on animals: No
Dr. Gross can Dew the impossible: a smart targeted delivery system that solves clashing under-eye concerns simultaneously: puffiness and dry fine lines. Moisture-attracting hyaluronic acid and elasticity-building Japanese green caviar algae provide line-filling hydration at the surface and improve skin suppleness. Caffeine, Caribbean gargonian extract, and sarsaparilla root work synergistically to improve the appearance of dark circles and puffiness by reducing water retention under the surface. Bonus optical diffusers add luminosity.
Water, Butylene Glycol, Glycerin, Caprylic/Capric Triglyceride, Silica, Sodium Hyaluronate, Saccharide Isomerate, Caulerpa Lentillifera Extract, Sea Whip Extract, Smilax Aristolochiifolia Root Extract, Glycyrrhiza Glabra (Licorice) Root Extract, Caffeine, Panthenol, Glucosyl Hesperidin, Asiaticoside, Madecassoside, Disodium Rutinyl Disulfate, Stearyl Heptanoate, Sodium PCA, Lactic Acid, Trehalose, Hydrogenated Lecithin, Citric Acid, Sodium Hydroxide, Acrylates/C10-30 Alkyl Acrylate Crosspolymer, Glyceryl Polyacrylate, Sodium Citrate, Xanthan Gum, Dimethicone, Sodium Potassium Aluminum Silicate, Carbomer, Phenoxyethanol, Benzyl Alcohol, Tin Oxide (CI 77861), Mica (CI 77019), Titanium Dioxide (CI 77891).

Dr. Dennis GrossSkincare At-A-Glance

Strengths: Almost all of the products are fragrance-free; several serums and moisturizers contain a brilliant assortment of beneficial skin-care ingredients; all of the sunscreens contain sufficient UVA protection; almost all of the antioxidant-rich products are packaged to ensure stability and potency.

Weaknesses: Expensive; no effective AHA or BHA products (including the at-home peel the line is "known" for); problematic toner; incomplete selection of products to treat acne, and whats available is more irritating than helpful; a few "why bother?" products.

As you may have gleaned from the name, dermatologist Dr. Dennis Gross created this skin-care line. Based in New York City, he claims that all of his products provide "maximum results without side effects," a statement any doctor should know better than to make. For instance, a consumer would logically assume, especially coming from a doctor, that "maximum results" means the products in question really will firm, lift, tighten, plump, or peel the skin. ButDr. Dennis GrossSkincare products don't provide maximum results, not in the least, and definitely not in any of the ways suggested by the marketing copy. In fact, although Gross includes some very impressive ingredients in his products, they cannot make good on the most enticing claims he makes for them.

As for the promise of "no side effects," that is easily refuted with a simple overview of his underachieving products. A quick summary: lavender oil can cause skin-cell death, sulfur is extremely irritating and drying to skin, ascorbic acid can be sensitizing, as can retinol, and the synthetic active sunscreen agents he uses can also present their share of problems. That's not to say that all of these ingredients are bad for skin (only the sulfur and lavender oil qualify for that description), but it's foolish to make a blanket statement that your cosmeceutical-type products are free of side effects. How could he possibly know what a person may react to?

Gross also asserts that he uses cutting-edge technology in his products, a point which I concede given the number of superior moisturizers and serums he offers, all of which compete nicely with other well-formulated products. His products are expensive, but if you're going to spend a lot of money on skin-care products, you should be purchasing state-of-the-art formulas, and these do rate. Of course, this technology (read: efficacious ingredients) doesn't extend to everyDr. Dennis GrossSkincare product, but overall this is one line whose formulas have improved considerably since the previous edition of this book, and that is excellent news!

Several of the products in this line contain emu oil. While there is research indicating that emu oil is a good emollient that can help heal skin, it is not that different from other oils that offer the same benefit, such as grape or olive or even mineral oil for that matter (Source: Australasian Journal of Dermatology, August 1996, pages 159161).

Last, please ignore the tired claim that these products are your alternative to surgical procedures and that they use medical-grade ingredients. Concerning the latter, there is no such thing; Gross uses the same cosmetic and over-the-counter active ingredients found throughout the cosmetics industry. And although his line offers some remarkable products, none of them can provide results equivalent to Botox, dermal fillers, chemical peels, or laser treatments (and definitely not a face-lift).

Note: Unless mentioned otherwise, all MD Skincare products are fragrance-free.

For more information about Dr. Dennis Gross Skincare, call (888) 830-7546 or visit the Web site at www.dgskincare.com.

NOTE: In Spring 2010, MD Skincare became Dr. Dennis Gross Skincare.

About the Experts

The Beautypedia team consists of skin care and makeup experts personally trained by the original Cosmetics Cop and best-selling beauty author, Paula Begoun. We’re fascinated by skin care and makeup products and thrilled when they meet or exceed our expectations, but we’re also disappointed when they fail to perform as claimed, are wildly overpriced, or contain ingredients scientific research has proven can hurt skin.

Our mission has always been to help you find the best products for your skin, no matter your budget or preferences. Beautypedia’s thorough and insightful reviews cut through the hype and provide reliable recommendations for all ages, skin types, and skin tones.