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Sephora

Glycolic Acid Glow Peeling Pads

60.00 pads for $ 15.00
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Brand Overview

Sephora’s Glycolic Acid Glow Peeling Pads are the brand’s idea of chemical exfoliation on the go, but the execution is misguided, making this one an easy pass.

These disposable pads come in a jar and are saturated with lightweight exfoliating solution that’s not sticky. One pad holds enough solution for your whole face.

The pH of these pads is around 4.55, which is a bit high for glycolic acid’s optimal exfoliation range of between 3 and 4 but can still provide some mild benefit in that regard, plus hydration. This also contains some antioxidant plant extracts, as well as soothing aloe.

But here’s where the issues start: these pads don’t contain actual glycolic acid; rather, they contain sugar cane and sugar maple extracts. While those can be a natural source of some AHAs, they have to be in a very high concentration, and don’t provide the same potency as glycolic acid itself. One side note: it should be noted that the jar packaging for these pads puts these fruit ingredients at risk for breaking down in the presence of light and air.

As a part of Sephora’s “Clean” line, this product is formulated without ingredients from an arbitrary list the brand has vowed to avoid using, and we’re disappointed that sensitizing citrus extracts (including orange and lemon) and fragrance aren’t on that list. Fragrance, regardless of if its natural or synthetic, can irritate skin. Using these over time can lead to more skin problems, not fewer (you can find the details in our More Info section below).

In short, you’re just not getting enough benefit here to make it worth the risk. There are far superior options on our list of best AHA exfoliants.

Pros:
  • Skin care solution is lightweight and non-sticky.
  • Includes some antioxidant plant extracts.
Cons:
  • pH is slightly above what’s considered optimal for exfoliation to occur.
  • Citrus extracts put skin at risk for irritation.
  • Fragrance presents an additional risk for irritation.
  • Jar packaging puts some ingredients at risk for breaking down in the presence of light and air.

More Info:

Irritating Ingredients: We cannot stress this enough: Sensitizing, harsh, abrasive, and/or fragrant ingredients are bad for all skin types. Daily application of skincare products that contain these irritating ingredients is a major way we unwittingly do our skin a disservice!

Irritating ingredients are a problem because they can lead to visible problems, such as redness, rough skin, dull skin, dryness, increased oil production, and clogged pores, and they contribute to making signs of aging worse.

Switching to non-irritating, gentle skincare products can make all the difference in the world. Non-irritating products are those packed with beneficial ingredients that also replenish and soothe skin, without any volatile ingredients, such as those present in fragrance ingredients, whether natural or synthetic.

A surprising fact: Research has demonstrated that you do not need to see or feel the effects of irritants on your skin for your skin to be suffering, and visible damage may not become apparent for a long time. Don’t get lulled into thinking that if you don’t see or feel signs of irritation, everything is OK.

Generally, it’s best to eliminate, or minimize as much as possible, your exposure to ingredients that are known to irritate skin. There are many completely non-irritating products that contain effective ingredients, so there’s no reason to put your skin at risk with products that include ingredients research has shown can be a problem.

References for this information:
Journal of Dermatological Sciences, January 2015, pages 28–36
International Journal of Cosmetic Science, August 2014, pages 379–385
Clinical Dermatology, May-June 2012, pages 257–262
Aging, March 2012, pages 166–175
Chemical Immunology and Allergy, March 2012, pages 77–80
Skin Pharmacology and Physiology, June 2008, pages 124–135
Food and Chemical Toxicology, February 2008, pages 446–475
American Journal of Clinical Dermatology, 2003, pages 789–798

Jar Packaging: Yes
Tested on animals: Yes

Formulated with 96 percent ingredients from natural origin, these SEPHORA COLLECTION peel pads are a new way to experience a "new skin" effect instantly. They eliminate residue, pore-clogging debris, and dead skin cells, leaving your skin feeling purified and soft. The appearance of imperfections disappears and your complexion regains its natural glow.

Water, Vaccinium Myrtillus Fruit Extract, Glycerin, Saccharum Officinarum (Sugar Cane) Extract, Butylene Glycol, Levulinic Acid, Sodium Benzoate, Citrus Aurantium Dulcis (Orange) Fruit Extract, Citrus Limon (Lemon) Fruit Extract, Perfume (Fragrance), Sodium Levulinate, Sodium Hydroxide, Acer Saccharum (Sugar Maple) Extract, Citric Acid, Chlorella Vulgaris Extract, Aloe Barbadensis Leaf Juice Powder, Potassium Sorbate.

Sephora At-A-Glance

Strengths: Inexpensive; some good cleansers and makeup removers; the Blotting Papers; good powder foundation; impressive blush and shiny eyeshadow options; great metallic finish eyeliner; awesome brow kit; bountiful selection of lipsticks and lip glosses; a couple of very good mascaras; several outstanding makeup brushes; testers are available in-store for each product, and sales pressure is practically nonexistent.

Weaknesses: Mostly average to below-average toners, moisturizers, and sunscreens; no options for those dealing with acne or skin discolorations; some SPF-rated products (including foundations) lack sufficient UVA-protecting actives; the lip plumper is too irritating; too many disappointing eye-makeup products, including several disappointing eyeliners and brow pencils; unappealing shimmer powders.

Sephora's first foray into skin care was back in 1994, when they offered a colorful, artfully packaged selection of bath gels. Their facial skin-care came on the scene a few years later, but for the most part wasn't worth waiting for. Sephora must not have been too pleased with these earlier versions, because lots of retooling has been done, although, sad to say, that hasn't improved on the ordinary, mundane status their products have consistently shared. Makeup is what Sephora's house brand does best. The only reason to shop this inexpensive skin-care selection is for everyday basics or the occasional impulse buy you may or may not enjoy adding to your routine. Otherwise, most of the skin-careproducts can't compete with the other brands sold in Sephora boutiques worldwide.

Note: Sephora is categorized as one that tests on animals because their products are sold in China. Although Sephora may not conduct animal testing for their products sold elsewhere, the Chinese government requires imported cosmetics be tested on animals, so foreign companies retailing there must comply. This requirement is why some brands state that they dont test on animals unless required by law. Animal rights organizations consider cosmetic companies retailed in China to be brands that test on animals, and so does the Beautypedia Research Team.

For more nformation about Sephora, call (877) 737-4672 or visit www.sephora.com.

Sephora Makeup

Once an incomplete line lacking such basics as foundation and concealer, Sephora's color collection has blossomed into a comprehensive group of products, most of which are priced considerably lower than products from the many other lines sold intheir boutiques. Although the low price and the selection may draw you in, not everything is worth exploring; for example, some of the products (for example the inexpensive pencils, which are not worth considering) demonstrate the old adage that sometimes you really do get what you pay for. That's not to say you have to spend a lot of money for quality makeup, but it does seem that many of Sephora's potential bargains are below average in terms of performance.

What you really should pay attention to are the pressed-powder foundation, one of the concealers, the powder blush, the liquid shimmer, and a few of the mascaras. Of course, the hallmark of this line has always been an extensive selection of makeup brushes. That still holds true, and you'll find that in this case the prices are more than fair.

More than most other makeup lines, Sephora excels with their accessory offerings. From makeup bags to train cases and on to all manner of beauty tools (from tweezers to nail clippers and manicure aids), the selection means you will assuredly find something that meets your needs. It's easy to get caught up in the variety and scope of Sephora's makeup, and testers are readily available so you can play all you want. That's great, but it doesnt compensate for a line with more than its share of average to poor products (and they change frequently, often not for the better). However, if you pay attention to the favorably rated products, you're more than likely to be very pleased.

About the Experts

The Beautypedia team consists of skin care and makeup experts personally trained by the original Cosmetics Cop and best-selling beauty author, Paula Begoun. We’re fascinated by skin care and makeup products and thrilled when they meet or exceed our expectations, but we’re also disappointed when they fail to perform as claimed, are wildly overpriced, or contain ingredients scientific research has proven can hurt skin.

Our mission has always been to help you find the best products for your skin, no matter your budget or preferences. Beautypedia’s thorough and insightful reviews cut through the hype and provide reliable recommendations for all ages, skin types, and skin tones.

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