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Ren

Evercalm Ultra Comforting Rescue Mask

1.70 fl. oz. for $ 40.00
Expert Rating

Expert Reviews

Community Reviews

Claims

Ingredients

Brand Overview

If you're struggling with dry, dehydrated, and reddened skin, it's not an exaggeration to state that Ren's Evercalm Ultra Comforting Rescue Mask is up to the task. Its lightweight, creamy, instantly-soothing texture contains a very good mix of calming antioxidants and moisturizing ingredients. If not for one formulary misstep, this mask would've earned our highest rating.

Best for normal to dry skin (and OK for occasional use on breakout-prone skin), this mask's opaque packaging keeps its beneficial ingredients protected from light and air exposure (both of which can cause plant extracts to weaken before they can help skin).

Ren advises leaving this mask on for 15 minutes, and although it certainly replenishes and revitalizes the complexion in that time, you'll see even better results if you leave this on overnight—particularly if layered over a well-formulated booster, serum or other redness-relieving treatment.

In a somewhat cruel (to skin) twist, Evercalm Ultra Comforting Rescue Mask needs saving from the fragrance it contains. What's that doing in a product meant to alleviate redness caused by sensitized skin? And their inclusion negates the brand's claim that the "bio actives" in this mask can somehow tell the brain to stop sending stress signals to skin. The fragrance ingredients cause stress!

At least this doesn't have a strong or lingering fragrance, but still, its inclusion kept this otherwise truly impressive mask from earning our top rating. See our list of best face masks for those that met our criteria.

Pros:
  • Creamy yet light texture feels protective and soothing.
  • Contains a very good mix of moisturizing and antioxidant ingredients.
  • Packaged to keep its light- and air-sensitive ingredients stable during use.
  • Replenishes and revitalizes skin in 15 minutes (without making it feel greasy).
Cons:
  • Contains a potentially irritating amount of fragrance.
  • The "bio-actives" can't stop the brain from sending stress signals to skin.
Jar Packaging: No
Tested on animals: No
Bye, bye, bad skin trip! Use this soothing, moisturizing mask to instantly alleviate redness and irritation caused by sensitized skin. Developed to stop the sensitive skin cycle, this calming mask uses our own complex of bio-actives, including white grifolin mushroom extract, that instantly soothe by stopping the brain from sending stress signals to the skin. Redness and irritation are reduced, resulting in a good skin trip.
Aqua (Water), Glycerin, Cetearyl Alcohol, Caprylyl Caprylate/Caprate, Olus Oil, Lactobacillus Ferment, Butyrospermum, Parkii (Shea) Butter, Helianthus Annuus (Sunflower) Seed Wax, Simmondsia Chinensis (Jojoba) Seed Oil, Cetearyl Glucoside, Propanediol, Algae Extract, Cetyl Alcohol, Lactobacillus, Alpha-Glucan Oligosaccharide, Parfum (Fragrance), Tocopheryl Acetate, Caprylic/Capric Triglyceride Panthenol, Carbomer, Vaccinium Vitas-Idaea (Lingonberry) Seed Oil, Xanthan Gum, Arnica Montana Flower Extract, Camelina Sativa Seed Oil, Cocus Nucifera (Coconut) Fruit Extract, Tocopherol, Magnesium Carboxymethyl Beta-Glucan, Malachite Extract, Albatrellus Ovinus Extract, Laminaria Ochroleuca Extract, Glucose, Phenoxyethanol, Helianthus Annuus (Sunflower) Seed Oil, Citric Acid, Sodium Hydroxide, Rosmarinus Officinalis Leaf Extract, Citronellol, Geraniol, Limonene, Linalool.

Ren At-A-Glance

Strengths: Good toner; some worthwhile moisturizers and masks (but not the anti-acne formula); a bounty of products for dry to very dry skin; some products contain especially high amounts of known antioxidants.

Weaknesses: Expensive; repetitive formulas that aren't nearly as natural as they're made out to be; several products contain irritants with no established benefit for skin; very irritating products for those with acne;no skin-lightening options; unappealing products for oily skin.

Hailing from the United Kingdom, the Ren line was developed by two businessmen who are, according to company information, "evangelical" about skin care. The story goes that Robert Calcraft and Anthony Buck were former consultants who began researching the skin-care market after Buck's wife began having adverse reactions to every skin-care product she used while pregnant. Apparently neither man believed that there was a line out there that offered consumers high-tech products that were "totally clean" and "completely effective," and so, voil, a new skin-care line was born.

We wish we could write that these men were really onto something for all women, not just Buck's wife, but that's simply not the case. First of all, their assessment of the cosmetics industry is bizarre, because in truth there are indeed many cosmetic lines offering "clean" and "effective" products ("clean," by Ren's definition, are products that don't contain problematic ingredients). Second, which lines did Ren's founders check out to determine that there was a missing link? An even better question is: What criteria were they using, because almost all of their products are either poorly formulated or contain irritating ingredients?

Calcraft and Buck apparently worked with a cosmetic pharmacologist; although that sounds impressive, a cosmetic pharmacologist works with drugs designed to improve mental ability in healthy individuals, not with skin-care formulations. All of this back story is nothing more than proof that the people behind this line really didn't do their homework, and the consumer who buys these products will be the poorer (both skin health- and money-wise) because of it.

It still shocks us when we review a line that's laden with products claiming to improve wrinkles and other signs of aging skin, and yet there's limited options for sun protection. Few researchers question how critical daily sun protection is to preserving the health and appearance of skin. Many of Ren's products contain antioxidants, and several have high amounts of green tea oil. But all the green tea in Japan isn't capable of protecting skin from environmental damage, which of course includes sunlight.

More so than many other lines that eschew certain ingredients for their alleged (and, sometimes, proven) negative effects when present in skin-care products, Ren loves to point out everything they don't use. This is a line for those who love to see the word "No" followed by a long list of chemical-sounding names that can seem scary to the uninformed. A consumer may have no idea what a polyquaternium is, but because of lines like Ren, the message is clear that it's not desirable. Ren doesn't provide any documentation supporting their ban on certain ingredients, which is typical of lines whose marketing angle relies on perpetuating the myth that synthetic ingredients are evil and that natural is the only truly safe way to go.

It would be great if Ren's "do not use" list benefited consumers, but it doesn't. Frustratingly, many of the ingredients Ren opts to use instead of synthetics are proven irritants for skin. Bergamot, peppermint, tangerine, and arnica are indeed natural ingredients, but each has its share of problems for skin. We could go on, but you get ourpoint: Ren is really nothing more than an overly fragranced, fear-mongering, natural "me too" line using the same tired plant-based ingredient angle as countless other brands. The difference is that many of those other brands have a product assortment that, either from a price or formulary perspective, is much better than this one.

For more information about Ren, now owned by Unilever, call (732) 553-1185 or visit www.renskincare.com.

About the Experts

The Beautypedia team consists of skin care and makeup experts personally trained by the original Cosmetics Cop and best-selling beauty author, Paula Begoun. We’re fascinated by skin care and makeup products and thrilled when they meet or exceed our expectations, but we’re also disappointed when they fail to perform as claimed, are wildly overpriced, or contain ingredients scientific research has proven can hurt skin.

Our mission has always been to help you find the best products for your skin, no matter your budget or preferences. Beautypedia’s thorough and insightful reviews cut through the hype and provide reliable recommendations for all ages, skin types, and skin tones.