0

Clinique

Even Better Brighter Essence Lotion

6.70 fl. oz. for $ 60.00
Expert Rating

Expert Reviews

Community Reviews

Claims

Ingredients

Brand Overview

Clinique’s Even Better Brighter Essence Lotion has the makings of a good skin brightener, but one bad ingredient keeps it from reaching its true potential.

Housed in an opaque plastic bottle, this essence is a liquid whose consistency is water-light. You can either apply it with your fingers or a cotton pad; either way, it absorbs quickly, leaving no residue.

Clinique’s radiance-boosting claims for this fragrance-free essence are valid. The formula contains two forms of vitamin C (ascorbyl glucoside and tetrahexyldecyl ascorbate) along with two forms of licorice extract, which research has shown can lead to a brighter, more even skin tone. Licorice can also soothe skin, and there are other antioxidants included in the formula to help strengthen skin’s barrier and defend against environmental damage.

Unfortunately, all this goodness comes after drying denatured alcohol in the ingredient list. There’s enough alcohol that you can smell it, and the formula feels drying, especially if your skin already lacks hydration, which is one of the issues this product is supposed to help with! Not only that, but alcohol can lead to several other problems, including damaging skin’s barrier (see More Info for details).

For all the positives about Even Better Brighter Essence Lotion, we can’t overlook the damage alcohol can do. For the health of your skin, stick to other, better-formulated toners and face mists that don’t make this misstep.

Pros:
  • Lightweight formula sinks into skin quickly.
  • Contains skin-brightening vitamin C and licorice extract.
  • Includes antioxidants to help strengthen skin’s barrier.
  • Packaged in a container that will protect its beneficial ingredients.
  • Fragrance free.
Cons:
  • Contains a high amount of drying denatured alcohol.

More Info:

Alcohol-Based Skincare Products: Research makes it clear that alcohol, as a main ingredient in any skincare product, especially one you use frequently and repeatedly, is a problem.

When we express concern about the presence of alcohol in skincare or makeup products, we’re referring to denatured ethanol, which most often is listed as SD alcohol, alcohol denat., denatured alcohol, or (less often) isopropyl alcohol.

When you see these types of alcohol listed among the first six ingredients on an ingredient label, without question the product will irritate and cause other problems for skin. There’s no way around it—these volatile alcohols are simply bad for all skin types.

The reason they’re included in products is because they provide a quick-drying finish, immediately degrease skin, and feel weightless, so it’s easy to see their appeal, especially for those with oily skin. If only those short-term benefits didn’t lead to negative long-term outcomes!

Using products that contain these alcohols will cause dryness, erosion of skin’s protective barrier, and a strain on how skin replenishes, renews, and rejuvenates itself. Alcohol just weakens everything about skin.

The irony of using alcohol-based products to control oily skin is that the damage from the alcohol can actually lead to an increase in breakouts and enlarged pores. As we said, the alcohol does have an immediate de-greasing effect on skin, but it causes irritation, which eventually will counteract the de-greasing effect and make your oily skin look even more shiny.

There are people who challenge us on the information we’ve presented about alcohol’s effects. They often base their argument on a study in the British Journal of Dermatology (July 2007, pages 74–81) that concluded “alcohol-based hand rubs cause less irritation than hand washing….” But, the only thing this study showed was that alcohol was not as irritating as an even more irritating hand wash, which contained sodium lauryl sulfate. So, the study is actually just telling you that one irritant, sodium lauryl sulfate, is worse than another irritant, alcohol.

Not all alcohols are bad. For example, there are fatty alcohols, which are absolutely non-irritating and can be beneficial for skin. Examples that you’ll see on ingredient labels include cetyl alcoholstearyl alcohol, and cetearyl alcohol, all of which are good ingredients for skin. It’s important to differentiate between these skin-friendly alcohols and the problematic alcohols.

References for this information:
Chemical Immunology and Allergy, March 2012, pages 77–80
Aging, March 2012, pages 166–175
Journal of Occupational Medicine and Toxicology, November 2008, pages 1–16
Dermato-Endocrinology, January 2011, pages 41–49
Experimental Dermatology, June 2008, pages 542–551
Clinical Dermatology, September-October 2004, pages 360–366
Alcohol Journal, April 2002, pages 179–190

Jar Packaging: No
Tested on animals: Yes

Instantly infuses skin with radiance and plumping hydration. Potent ingredients visibly reduce existing dark spots, while calming ingredients help defuse the effects of irritation that can trigger future darkening. Skin becomes ever more luminous, enjoying newfound clarity and translucence and a smooth, supple feel.

Water, Methyl Gluceth-20, Alcohol Denat., Glycereth-26, Butylene Glycol, Ascorbyl Glucoside, Glycerin, PEG-11 Methyl Ether Dimethicone, Hypnea Musciformis (Algae) Extract, Camellia Sinensis Leaf Extract, Gellidiela Acerosa (Algae) Extract, Scutellaria Baicalensis Root Extract, Algae Extract, Glycyrrhiza Glabra (Licorice) Leaf Extract, Molasses Extract/Saccharum Officinarum, Arginine, Yeast Polysaccharides, Sucrose, Hydrolyzed Prunus Domestica, Dipotassium Glycyrrhizate, Sodium Hyaluronate, Caffeine, PPG-6-Decyltetradeceth-30, Sodium Citrate, Citric Acid, Hydroxyethylcellulose, Tetrahexyldecyl Ascorbate, Potassium Sorbate, Disodium EDTA, Phenoxyethanol.

Clinique At-A-Glance

Strengths: A few excellent moisturizers and serums; excellent sunscreens; very good cleansers and eye makeup removers; unique mattifying products; impressive selection of foundations, good concealers; some remarkable mascaras; much-improved eyeshadows, lip colors and blush formulas.

Weaknesses: Bar soaps (which can clog pores and dull skin); alcohol-based toners; unfortunate choice of jar packaging for antioxidant-loaded moisturizers.

Estee Lauder-owned Clinique launched the concept of cosmetics being "allergy-tested," "hypoallergenic," "100% fragrance-free," and "dermatologist tested." Of those marketing claims, the only one with significance is "100% fragrance-free," which, for the most part, Clinique maintains (although it does add some fragrant extracts to a few products). Unfortunately, terms like hypoallergenic and dermatologist tested arent regulated by the FDA and can mean anythingthus, you still need to rely on the ingredient list to tell you whether their product contains any ingredients with the potential to irritate skin.

That inconvenient fact aside, Clinique is leading the way with cutting-edge, state-of-the-art moisturizers and serums, plus some formidable makeup and more than a few excellent sunscreens. While Clinique has some products that we see as missteps for reasons discussed in their reviews, more than ever, what they offer is quite good (just have realistic expectations, as some of their claims go beyond what their products are capable of).

Turning to makeup, Clinique continues to offer a vast palette of colors and textures, especially with their enormous selection of foundationsmany of which feature effective sunscreens. Without a doubt, the numerous formulas offer something for every skin type and almost every skin colorthough the blushes, eye makeup and lip colors are frequently not pigmented enough for deeper skin tones.

The bottom line is that, despite a few shortcomings, Clinique is one of the most comprehensive (and comparably affordable) department-store makeup lines, and it is completely understandable why they enjoy such broad appeal.

Note: Clinique is categorized as one that tests on animals because their products are sold in China. Although Clinique does not conduct animal testing for their products sold elsewhere, the Chinese government requires imported cosmetics be tested on animals, so foreign companies retailing there must comply. This requirement is why some brands state that they dont test on animals unless required by law. Animal rights organizations consider cosmetic companies retailed in China to be brands that test on animals, and so does the Beautypedia Team.

For more information about Clinique, call (800) 419-4041 or visit www.clinique.com.

About the Experts

The Beautypedia team consists of skin care and makeup experts personally trained by the original Cosmetics Cop and best-selling beauty author, Paula Begoun. We’re fascinated by skin care and makeup products and thrilled when they meet or exceed our expectations, but we’re also disappointed when they fail to perform as claimed, are wildly overpriced, or contain ingredients scientific research has proven can hurt skin.

Our mission has always been to help you find the best products for your skin, no matter your budget or preferences. Beautypedia’s thorough and insightful reviews cut through the hype and provide reliable recommendations for all ages, skin types, and skin tones.