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Bliss

Clog Dissolving Cleansing Milk

6.70 fl. oz. for $ 28.00
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This milky lotion cleanser is the opposite of what someone with oily/combination skin should be looking for. The overly emollient formula cannot sufficiently cleanse oily skin, will not dissolve clogs, is tricky to rinse, and likely will make clogged pores worse. It also contains fragrant ingredients that are a problem for all skin types (see More Info). Steer clear of this chaotic cleanser!

One more comment: Clogged pores (such as blackheads and white bumps) require more than a cleanser, and, in fact, a cleanser has little impact on helping to dissolve the buildup of sebum (oil) and cellular debris that clogs the pore lining. To get a handle on clogged pores, use a water-soluble cleanser with a soft washcloth and follow with a beta hydroxy acid (BHA) exfoliant. Its active ingredient (salicylic acid) can penetrate the pore to free the clogged contents.

Pros:

  • None.

Cons:

  • Overly emollient cleanser is problematic for oily skin.
  • Will not dissolve clogs.
  • Contains a lot of fragrance, which can be irritating for all skin types.

More Info:

Daily use of products that contain a high amount of fragrance, whether the fragrant ingredients are synthetic or natural, causes chronic irritation that can damage healthy collagen production, lead to or worsen dryness, and impair your skin’s ability to heal. Fragrance-free is the best way to go for all skin types. If fragrance in your skin-care products is important to you, it should be a very low amount to minimize the risk to your skin. (Sources: Inflammation Research, December 2008, pages 558–563; Skin Pharmacology and Physiology, June 2008, pages 124–135, and November-December 2000, pages 358–371; Journal of Investigative Dermatology, April 2008, pages 15–19; Journal of Cosmetic Dermatology, March 2008, pages 78–82; Mechanisms of Ageing and Development, January 2007, pages 92–105; and British Journal of Dermatology, December 2005, pages S13–S22.)

Jar Packaging: No
Tested on animals: No

Whether your face suffers from the typical t-zone traffic jam or is oily all over, this marvel of a milky wash will keep it 'in the clear'.

Water (Aqua), C12-15 Alkyl Benzoate, Butylene Glycol, Glycerin, Methyl Gluceth-20 Benzoate, Glycine Soja (Soybean) Oil, PEG-40 Stearate, Sodium Dihydroxycetyl Phosphate, Cholesterol, Isostearic Acid, Triethanolamine, Acrylates/C10-30 Alkyl Acrylate Crosspolymer, Fragrance, Diazolidinyl Urea, Methylparaben, Tetrasodium EDTA, Behenyl Alcohol, Propylparaben, Butyrospermum Parkii (Shea Butter), Citrus Aurantium Amara (Bitter Orange) Peel Extract, Hydrogenated Castor Oil, Stearyl Alcohol, Xanthan Gum, Protease, Subtilisin, Sodium Hyaluronate, Ascorbic Acid, Hydrolyzes Milk Protein, Tocopheryl Acetate, Vitis Vinifera (Grape) Seed Extract

The story of Bliss starts in 1996, when personal trainer Marcia Kilgore opened a New York spa designed around no-fuss skin treatments and de-stressing regimens for busy lifestyles. Over time, clients asked for Bliss-branded skin care products, and so Bliss skin care was born.

Bliss enjoyed success for years, being sold in spas as well as online and at some brick-and-mortar retailers. Kilgore eventually sold Bliss, and after changing hands a couple more times, the brand began to lose some of its identity. Its most recent owners decided it was time for a back to our roots makeover, with lower prices across the board and a cleaner version of Blisss iconic white with splashes of color packaging.

Blisss biggest appeal is in providing people with a spa-like experience at home. The line features multiple masks, in addition to exfoliation treatments, moisturizers, and body care products for a variety of skin types and concerns. While there are some missteps in the line (including fragranced products and some instances of jar packaging), there are some gems to be found among Blisss offerings you just have to know where to look.

For more information on Bliss, visit www.blissworld.com.

About the Experts

The Beautypedia team consists of skin care and makeup experts personally trained by the original Cosmetics Cop and best-selling beauty author, Paula Begoun. We’re fascinated by skin care and makeup products and thrilled when they meet or exceed our expectations, but we’re also disappointed when they fail to perform as claimed, are wildly overpriced, or contain ingredients scientific research has proven can hurt skin.

Our mission has always been to help you find the best products for your skin, no matter your budget or preferences. Beautypedia’s thorough and insightful reviews cut through the hype and provide reliable recommendations for all ages, skin types, and skin tones.

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