Dr Jart Ceramidin Liquid
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Dr. Jart

Ceramidin Liquid

5.07 fl. oz. for $ 39.00
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Ingredients

Brand Overview

Dr. Jart’s Ceramidin Liquid is intended to “save” dry, damaged skin, but it’s far from the solution parched skin needs to restore itself.

This toner-like fluid is aesthetically pleasing, spreading easily across skin and sinking in within a matter of seconds. It leaves skin looking plumped and moisturized, with no tackiness, making it suitable for all skin types.

Antioxidant-wise this offers more than the other products in the Ceramidin line, and there are skin-restoring ingredients as well, including the ceramides that are alluded to in this product’s name (though it should be noted, they are near the end of the ingredient list).

So far, so good, but here’s the catch: every single beneficial ingredient here comes after drying alcohol in the ingredient list. Alcohol is third in the lineup, meaning you’re getting quite a bit of it. This ingredient contributes to this product’s lightweight feel but can cause skin irritation that over time can make dry skin even worse (see More Info for details).

As if that weren’t enough, the formula also includes fragrant oils (among them bergamot, and patchouli) that can trigger additional skin irritation. The end result? A moisture barrier that’s weakened, instead of strengthened as this product claims it can do.

There are far better toners and moisturizers out there that give skin the lightweight moisture it craves without compromising it like Ceramidin Liquid.

Pros:
  • Lightweight and aesthetically elegant.
  • Contains antioxidant and skin-restoring ingredients.
Cons:
  • Includes a high amount of drying alcohol.
  • Contains fragrant oils that can trigger irritation.

More Info:

Alcohol-Based Skincare Products: Research makes it clear that alcohol, as a main ingredient in any skincare product, especially one you use frequently and repeatedly, is a problem.

When we express concern about the presence of alcohol in skincare or makeup products, we’re referring to denatured ethanol, which most often is listed as SD alcohol, alcohol denat., denatured alcohol, or (less often) isopropyl alcohol.

When you see these types of alcohol listed among the first six ingredients on an ingredient label, without question the product will irritate and cause other problems for skin. There’s no way around it—these volatile alcohols are simply bad for all skin types.

The reason they’re included in products is because they provide a quick-drying finish, immediately degrease skin, and feel weightless, so it’s easy to see their appeal, especially for those with oily skin. If only those short-term benefits didn’t lead to negative long-term outcomes!

Using products that contain these alcohols will cause dryness, erosion of skin’s protective barrier, and a strain on how skin replenishes, renews, and rejuvenates itself. Alcohol just weakens everything about skin.

The irony of using alcohol-based products to control oily skin is that the damage from the alcohol can actually lead to an increase in breakouts and enlarged pores. As we said, the alcohol does have an immediate de-greasing effect on skin, but it causes irritation, which eventually will counteract the de-greasing effect and make your oily skin look even more shiny.

There are people who challenge us on the information we’ve presented about alcohol’s effects. They often base their argument on a study in the British Journal of Dermatology (July 2007, pages 74–81) that concluded “alcohol-based hand rubs cause less irritation than hand washing….” But, the only thing this study showed was that alcohol was not as irritating as an even more irritating hand wash, which contained sodium lauryl sulfate. So, the study is actually just telling you that one irritant, sodium lauryl sulfate, is worse than another irritant, alcohol.

Not all alcohols are bad. For example, there are fatty alcohols, which are absolutely non-irritating and can be beneficial for skin. Examples that you’ll see on ingredient labels include cetyl alcoholstearyl alcohol, and cetearyl alcohol, all of which are good ingredients for skin. It’s important to differentiate between these skin-friendly alcohols and the problematic alcohols.

References for this information:
Chemical Immunology and Allergy, March 2012, pages 77–80
Aging, March 2012, pages 166–175
Journal of Occupational Medicine and Toxicology, November 2008, pages 1–16
Dermato-Endocrinology, January 2011, pages 41–49
Experimental Dermatology, June 2008, pages 542–551
Clinical Dermatology, September-October 2004, pages 360–366
Alcohol Journal, April 2002, pages 179–190

Tested on animals: Yes

This liquid skin saver plumps and seals dull, dry skin for all day moisture. The serum acts as a liquid cushion that strengthens and protects skin barrier from chronic water loss with the power of ceramides. It transforms rough and dehydrated skin into a hydrated, healthy glow.

Water, Dipropylene Glycol, Alcohol, Betaine, Propanediol, Glycosyl Trehalose, 1,2-Hexanediol, Erythritol, Pentylene Glycol, Glycerin, Hydrogenated Starch Hydrolysate, Acrylates/C10-30 Alkyl Acrylate Crosspolymer, Triethylhexanoin, Diphenyl Dimethicone, Triethylhexanoin, Panthenol, Butylene Glycol, Hydrogenated Lecithin, Centella Asiatica Extract, Icus Carica (Fig) Fruit Extract, Melia Azadirachta Leaf Extract, Theobroma Cacao (Cocoa) Seed Extract, Amaranthus Caudatus Seed Extract, Ulmus Davidiana Root Extract, Curcuma Longa (Turmeric) Root Extract, Ocimum Sanctum Leaf Extract, Corallina Officinalis Extract, Pyracantha Fortuneana Fruit Extract, Carbomer, Cellulose Gum, Sucrose Distearate, Dipotassium Glycyrrhizate, Ethylhexylglycerin, Methylpropanediol, Disodium EDTA, Glyceryl Polymethacrylate, Citrus Aurantium Bergamia (Bergamot) Fruit Oil, C12-14 Pareth-12, Polyglyceryl-10 Myristate, Pelargonium Graveolens Flower Oil, Dextrin, Glyceryl Stearate, Sodium Hyaluronate, Salvia Officinalis (Sage) Oil, Pogostemon Cablin Oil, Cholesterol, Ceramide EOP, Ceramide AP, Ceramide AS, Ceramide NS.

Dr. Jart+ At-a-Glance

Strengths: The BB creams (Beauty Balms) provide broad-spectrum sun protection and are fragrance-free.

Weaknesses: Expensive; BB creams are little more than tinted moisturizers with sunscreen; the masks are gimmicky and minimally helpful for skin.

Dr. Jart+ is a line of skin-care products based in Korea. Its most popular products are the Beauty Balms, known in the United States as BB creams. Before we discuss this brand's contribution to the BB cream craze, we want to state that at this time we are reviewing only the Dr. Jart+ products that are available at U.S. Sephora stores. If you visit the Korean Dr. Jart+ Web site, you'll see several other skin-care products are offered. We might review those in the future, but it's clear that the questions we've received about this brand have to do with the BB creams.

No information is available about an actual Dr. Jart, and our Korean friends tell us there is no actual Dr. Jart, so it is a made up name to help give the line some credibility. According to the company's English Web site, the brand is supposed to be the brainchild of multiple dermatologists as well as 21 "medical specialists." That's a lot of cooks for one product line, but as we've reported before, and as many of you know from experience, there are plenty of doctors' products that are terribly formulated and that come in bad packaging. All that really counts is whether or not you should give this line a closer look, despite the marketing claims

It didn't take much review to discover that there is nothing particularly medical or dermatologist-oriented about these products. The people behind Dr. Jart+ don't have access to any special ingredients other cosmetic companies can't use, and their products contain no unique ingredients that have any research showing that they improve skin. U.S. Sephora stores sell two BB cream options from Dr. Jart+; one of them is great and the other is lacking in too many areas to make it worth purchasing. But the question remains, should you purchase a BB cream at all? They are not must-have products, and most are far from being the "new idea in skin care" they're made out to be. Essentially, whether they're called BB creams, Blemish Balms, or Beauty Balms, all of these products are little more than tinted moisturizers with sunscreen. Some include a helpful amount of beneficial ingredients like antioxidants or skin-lightening agents (vitamin C, arbutin) to improve brown spots. Such discolorations are considered a blemish in Asian cultures, but that's the only distinguishing feature. Compared with standard tinted moisturizers, BB creams typically provide slightly to moderately more coverage. In that sense, they fall between tinted moisturizers and foundations, but many BB creams go on sheer also; so, ultimately, it comes down to the individual products. If you're happily using a tinted moisturizer with sunscreen, there's no reason to forgo it in favor of a BB cream, but there's no harm in testing them out to see if you prefer their effect. Most won't notice much difference between them and a tinted moisturizer.

For more information about Dr. Jart+, visit http://www.drjart.co.kr/global/eng/.

Note: The company does not publish a phone number on its Web site, which doesn't bode well for building consumer trust or obtaining any help from customer service, so buyer beware.

About the Experts

The Beautypedia team consists of skin care and makeup experts personally trained by the original Cosmetics Cop and best-selling beauty author, Paula Begoun. We’re fascinated by skin care and makeup products and thrilled when they meet or exceed our expectations, but we’re also disappointed when they fail to perform as claimed, are wildly overpriced, or contain ingredients scientific research has proven can hurt skin.

Our mission has always been to help you find the best products for your skin, no matter your budget or preferences. Beautypedia’s thorough and insightful reviews cut through the hype and provide reliable recommendations for all ages, skin types, and skin tones.

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