Dr Jart Ceramidin Facial Mask
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Dr. Jart

Ceramidin Facial Mask

1.00 mask for $ 6.00
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Brand Overview

The number of options available to sheet masks continues to grow, but Dr. Jart’s Ceramidin Facial Mask is not among those we recommend if you’re a fan of this type of mask!

The first issue with this cloth sheet mask is that it’s super-saturated in its skin care emulsion, making it goopy and hard to unfold. The cloth is sturdy enough that it doesn’t rip during the unfolding process, but it’s still unwieldy. Once that task is done, this mask easily adheres to your face, where you’re supposed to let it sit for 20 minutes, then remove and rub the rest of the solution into skin.

The result is an instantly hydrated and smoother appearance, and the solution absorbs without any residual stickiness. Among the good ingredients are plumping hyaluronic acid (in four forms!) and skin-restoring ingredients.

At issue is that most of the good ingredients come after volatile fragrant oils that can trigger irritation that damages skin’s barrier (see More Info for details). Those fragrant oils include geranium, bergamot, and patchouli, and you can smell them all strongly as soon as you remove the mask from its pouch.

Another problem is that though this product’s name is “Ceramidin” (a play on words for the skin-replenishing ingredient ceramide) it contains fewer ceramides than the rest of the products in this line, and it’s light on antioxidants that would truly help this product repair skin’s barrier.

If you’re a sheet mask fan there are far better options out there (including many well-formulated serums, which can be a great alternative to masks), so there’s no reason to waste your time on this one.

Pros:
  • Makes skin appear hydrated and smoother.
  • Contains four forms of skin-replenishing hyaluronic acid.
  • Includes skin-restoring ingredients.
Cons:
  • Mask is super-saturated and tricky to work with.
  • Contains fragrant oils that can trigger skin irritation.
  • Light on antioxidants to help skin’s moisture barrier.
  • Considering its name, is short on ceramides.

More Info:

Why Fragrance Is a Problem for Skin: Daily use of products that contain a high amount of fragrance, whether the fragrant ingredients are synthetic or natural, causes a chronic sensitizing reaction on skin.

This reaction in turn leads to all kinds of problems, including disrupting skin’s barrier, worsening dryness, increasing or triggering redness, depleting vital substances in skin’s surface, and generally preventing skin from looking healthy, smooth, and hydrated. Fragrance free is always the best way to go for all skin types.

A surprising fact: Even though you can’t always see or feel the negative effects of fragrant ingredients on skin, the damage will still be taking place, even if it’s not evident on the surface. Research has demonstrated that you don’t need to see or feel the effects of irritation for your skin to be suffering. Much like the effects from cumulative sun damage, the negative impact and the visible damage from fragrance may not become apparent for a long time.

References for this information:
Biochimica and Biophysica Acta, May 2012, pages 1410–1419
Aging, March 2012, pages 166–175
Chemical Immunology and Allergy, March 2012, pages 77–80
Experimental Dermatology, October 2009, pages 821–832
Skin Pharmacology and Physiology, 2008, pages 191–202
International Journal of Toxicology, Volume 27, 2008, Supplement, pages 1–43
Food and Chemical Toxicology, February 2008, pages 446–475
American Journal of Clinical Dermatology, 2003, pages 789–798

Jar Packaging: No
Tested on animals: Yes

Ceramidin Mask forms a moisturizing barrier and prevents moisture from evaporating with its soft emulsion formula, provides a smooth finish without stickiness, and immediately improves skin texture. Skin-friendly nanoskin fabric seamlessly and softly wraps on skin to effectively deliver active ingredients.

Water, Butylene Glycol, Glycerin, Propanediol, 1,2-Hexanediol, Helianthus Annuus (Sunflower) Seed Oil, Pelargonium Graveolens Flower Oil, Salvia Officinalis (Sage) Oil, Citrus Aurantium Bergamia (Bergamot) Fruit Oil, Sodium Hyaluronate, Pogostemon Cablin Oil, Bixa Orellana Seed Oil, Honey Extract, Ceramide NP (Ceramide 3), Xylityglucoside, Anhydroxylitol, Panthenol, Hydrolyzed Hyaluronic Acid, Hyaluronic Acid, Hydrolyzed Glycosaminoglycans, Carylic/Capric Triglyceride, C12-16 Alcohols, Butylene Glycol Dicaprylate/Dicaprate, Allantoin, Xylitol, Arginine, Carbomer, Hydrogenated Lecithin, Sodium Stearoyl Glutamate, Palmitic Acid, Ethylhexylglycerin, Xanthan Gum, Disodium EDTA, Dextrin, Glycine Soja (Soybean) Oil, Glucose, Caramel, Glyceryl Acrylate/Acrylic Acid Copolymer, Tocopherol, Sodium Hyaluronate Crosspolymer, Hydroxypropyl Methylcellulose, Calcium Carbonate.

Dr. Jart+ At-a-Glance

Strengths: The BB creams (Beauty Balms) provide broad-spectrum sun protection and are fragrance-free.

Weaknesses: Expensive; BB creams are little more than tinted moisturizers with sunscreen; the masks are gimmicky and minimally helpful for skin.

Dr. Jart+ is a line of skin-care products based in Korea. Its most popular products are the Beauty Balms, known in the United States as BB creams. Before we discuss this brand's contribution to the BB cream craze, we want to state that at this time we are reviewing only the Dr. Jart+ products that are available at U.S. Sephora stores. If you visit the Korean Dr. Jart+ Web site, you'll see several other skin-care products are offered. We might review those in the future, but it's clear that the questions we've received about this brand have to do with the BB creams.

No information is available about an actual Dr. Jart, and our Korean friends tell us there is no actual Dr. Jart, so it is a made up name to help give the line some credibility. According to the company's English Web site, the brand is supposed to be the brainchild of multiple dermatologists as well as 21 "medical specialists." That's a lot of cooks for one product line, but as we've reported before, and as many of you know from experience, there are plenty of doctors' products that are terribly formulated and that come in bad packaging. All that really counts is whether or not you should give this line a closer look, despite the marketing claims

It didn't take much review to discover that there is nothing particularly medical or dermatologist-oriented about these products. The people behind Dr. Jart+ don't have access to any special ingredients other cosmetic companies can't use, and their products contain no unique ingredients that have any research showing that they improve skin. U.S. Sephora stores sell two BB cream options from Dr. Jart+; one of them is great and the other is lacking in too many areas to make it worth purchasing. But the question remains, should you purchase a BB cream at all? They are not must-have products, and most are far from being the "new idea in skin care" they're made out to be. Essentially, whether they're called BB creams, Blemish Balms, or Beauty Balms, all of these products are little more than tinted moisturizers with sunscreen. Some include a helpful amount of beneficial ingredients like antioxidants or skin-lightening agents (vitamin C, arbutin) to improve brown spots. Such discolorations are considered a blemish in Asian cultures, but that's the only distinguishing feature. Compared with standard tinted moisturizers, BB creams typically provide slightly to moderately more coverage. In that sense, they fall between tinted moisturizers and foundations, but many BB creams go on sheer also; so, ultimately, it comes down to the individual products. If you're happily using a tinted moisturizer with sunscreen, there's no reason to forgo it in favor of a BB cream, but there's no harm in testing them out to see if you prefer their effect. Most won't notice much difference between them and a tinted moisturizer.

For more information about Dr. Jart+, visit http://www.drjart.co.kr/global/eng/.

Note: The company does not publish a phone number on its Web site, which doesn't bode well for building consumer trust or obtaining any help from customer service, so buyer beware.

About the Experts

The Beautypedia team consists of skin care and makeup experts personally trained by the original Cosmetics Cop and best-selling beauty author, Paula Begoun. We’re fascinated by skin care and makeup products and thrilled when they meet or exceed our expectations, but we’re also disappointed when they fail to perform as claimed, are wildly overpriced, or contain ingredients scientific research has proven can hurt skin.

Our mission has always been to help you find the best products for your skin, no matter your budget or preferences. Beautypedia’s thorough and insightful reviews cut through the hype and provide reliable recommendations for all ages, skin types, and skin tones.

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