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TheBalm

Carrot Eye Makeup Remover

6.00 fl. oz. for $ 18.00
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Ingredients

Brand Overview

This is a good, fairly basic, detergent-based eye-makeup remover that's essentially a liquid version of a mild water-soluble facial cleanser. It removes most types of eye makeup, but a silicone-in-water formula is better for dissolving long-wearing or waterproof formulas. In addition, the latter type of makeup remover poses less risk of stinging if it gets in your eyes.

Still, some people prefer a makeup remover like this one from theBalm, and it's worth considering. The only ingredient of concern is the carrot root extract, as that has the potential to be irritating; however, the amount is likely too low for it to be an issue.

Carrot Eye Makeup Remover is suitable for all skin types and, true to claim, it doesn't leave a residue.

Pros:
  • Mild formula removes most types of makeup.
  • Good for those who prefer a makeup remover with more "cleansing" action.
  • Doesn't leave a residue.
Cons:
  • The cleansing agent, while gentle, poses a risk of stinging if you get it in your eyes.
Jar Packaging: No
Tested on animals: No

Our oil-free Carrot Eye Makeup Remover gently washes away all types of makeup, without leaving unwanted residue.

Water, Decyl Glucoside, Sodium Lauroyl Lactylate, Butylene Glycol, Polysorbate 20, Aloe Barbadensis Leaf Juice, Phenoxyethanol, Caprylyl Glycol, Ethylhexylglycerin, Glycerin, Hexylene Glycol, Camellia Sinensis Leaf Extract, Daucus Carota Sativa (Carrot) Root Extract, Disodium EDTA

Today, most cosmetics companies seem to be launched for one of three distinct reasons: they come about as the extension of a high-end fashion house's brand (like Burberry, Tom Ford, Dolce & Gabbana, Marc Jacobs, or Armani); they're created by some corporation under the endorsement of a celebrity (Drew Barrymore's Flower Beauty or Kat Von D's line); or, as is the case for theBalm Cosmetics, an entrepreneur saw an "unfilled niche" in the cosmetics market and decided to get to work.

theBalm was founded in San Francisco by Marissa Shipman, who spent years trying to break into the cosmetics industry before forming her own company in 2004. As the story goes, she crafted her own products in her kitchen by consulting makeup books she bought from Amazon.com. Eventually she was able to hire a chemist, get a lab (Bye-bye, kitchen workshop!), and secure distribution through cosmetics retailer Sephora. theBalm's products have (pardon the pun) exploded and are now sold in dozens of countries worldwide.

It's interesting to note that theBalm is quite reminiscent of the Benefit brand; the similarity of the packaging, marketing, colors, product selection, and even the place of origin - San Francisco is blatant. Featuring recyclable cardboard packaging with retro pinup-style artwork and cutesy names, theBalm line includes both makeup and skin care products, and is reasonably priced, although it's definitely more expensive than what you'll find at the drugstore.

The company's makeup is definitely its stronger suit, with some good options, such as a couple eyeshadow palettes, the mascara, and its pressed-powder blushes. It has one true blockbuster product: Balm Shelter tinted moisturizer. This standout product performs amazingly well and is deserving of its many accolades.

Unfortunately, theBalm also has some problematic makeup, in particular, and ironically, their lip products. The inclusion of irritants in two of its lip products is disappointing, and an otherwise excellent lip gloss (with SPF, no less) is marred by a fragrance that's downright overwhelming initially and potentially irritating if used every day.

As far as skin-care, the company's collection, called TimeBalm, is surprisingly larger than you might think. It includes cleansers, toners, moisturizers, AHA exfoliants, masks, eye-area products, and a handful of ancillary items that are questionable in terms of their benefitthough some of them, like the foundation primer, are indeed worth checking out.

Overall, based on the formulas, theres little reason to give the majority of these skin-care products a second thought, as most of them are laced with one or more problematic ingredients or, in the case of most of the moisturizers, suffer due to jar packaging, which compromises the products stability. The prices are good, but theres not much value in saving money on average-to-problematic products, especially when spending just a bit more can get you far better formulas.

theBalm boasts that TimeBalm skin-care products are free of parabens, synthetic dyes, and phthalates, and many consumers seem to be seeking such products. However, parabens are not a problem, and phthalates arent usually included in skin-care productstheyre more often seen in nail polish and in some fragrances. Not including synthetic dyes is helpful, but it would have been even better for your skin if theBalm had avoided fragrant oils and other plant-based irritants. Lots of theBalm products contain great natural ingredients, but theyre often commingled with potentially irritating natural ingredients, and that doesnt add up to great skin careits more of a ticking time bomb than anything else.

For more information, visit www.thebalm.com. And yes, we're aware that "it's thebalm.com" is an expression used to indicate something that's totally cool. Coincidence? We'll let the reviews speak for themselves!

About the Experts

The Beautypedia team consists of skin care and makeup experts personally trained by the original Cosmetics Cop and best-selling beauty author, Paula Begoun. We’re fascinated by skin care and makeup products and thrilled when they meet or exceed our expectations, but we’re also disappointed when they fail to perform as claimed, are wildly overpriced, or contain ingredients scientific research has proven can hurt skin.

Our mission has always been to help you find the best products for your skin, no matter your budget or preferences. Beautypedia’s thorough and insightful reviews cut through the hype and provide reliable recommendations for all ages, skin types, and skin tones.

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