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Chanel

Blue Serum

1.00 fl. oz. for $ 110.00
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As the saying goes, "You gotta' have a gimmick", and while we acknowledge a good marketing story can help stir interest in a product, Chanel's Blue Serum's story is at best farfetched, especially in terms of what you can expect from this expensive, utterly disappointing product.

Before we discuss Blue Serum's story further, you need to know the problems your face would be facing that would make it feel sad and blue. First, it contains two problematic ingredients (alcohol and fragrance) that pose a strong risk of irritation—a side effect that's pro-aging not anti-aging, as we explain in the More Info section.

Now for the gimmick. Packaged in an opaque white bottle with a pump applicator, Blue Serum was supposedly inspired by the longevity of people who live in the world's blue zones. Those are areas like Okinawa, Japan, and Sardinia, Italy, where people live longer, largely believed to be due to their diets and lifestyle choices. To that end, Chanel has sourced three plant extracts from "blue zones" in Greece, Italy, and Costa Rica, each said to deliver their longevity benefits for younger-looking skin.

It seems interesting on the surface, but the whole concept of blue zones and a person's longevity is multi-faceted, it's about overall diet, possibly genetics, and lifestyle, and most likely a combination of all three. Nowhere in the research are the ingredients Chanel chose part of living longer or having younger skin. The notion is really absurd. Simply put, the blue zone's longevity theory is interesting but its benefits can't be bottled in any way, shape, or form.

Turning to esthetics, Blue Serum has a lightweight, silky texture that smooths easily over skin. Along with the exotic plant extracts, Chanel also included niacinamide and some non-fragrant plant oils and fatty acids. Minus the alcohol and fragrance we mentioned above, this would rank as a respectable, albeit pricey, serum. As is, we advise you to turn to our list of Best Serums for preferred options.

Pros:
  • Lightweight, silky texture is easy to apply.
  • Contains niacinamide plus some very good, potent antioxidants.
  • Packaged to keep light- and air-sensitive ingredients stable during use.
Cons:
  • The amount of alcohol it contains poses a strong risk of irritation.
  • Contains fragrance that lingers on skin, posing further risk of irritation.
  • Sets to a sticky finish that can feel tight and drying.
  • Overpriced compared to today's best serums.
More Info:

Alcohol-Based Skincare Products: Research makes it clear that alcohol, as a main ingredient in any skincare product, especially one you use frequently and repeatedly, is a problem.

When we express concern about the presence of alcohol in skincare or makeup products, we're referring to denatured ethanol, which most often is listed as SD alcohol, alcohol denat., denatured alcohol, or (less often) isopropyl alcohol.

When you see these types of alcohol listed among the first six ingredients on an ingredient label, without question the product will irritate and cause other problems for skin. There's no way around it—these volatile alcohols are simply bad for all skin types.

The reason they're included in products is because they provide a quick-drying finish, immediately degrease skin, and feel weightless, so it's easy to see their appeal, especially for those with oily skin. If only those short-term benefits didn't lead to negative long-term outcomes!

Using products that contain these alcohols will cause dryness, erosion of skin's protective barrier, and a strain on how skin replenishes, renews, and rejuvenates itself. Alcohol just weakens everything about skin.

The irony of using alcohol-based products to control oily skin is that the damage from the alcohol can actually lead to an increase in breakouts and enlarged pores. As we said, the alcohol does have an immediate de-greasing effect on skin, but it causes irritation, which eventually will counteract the de-greasing effect and make your oily skin look even more shiny.

There are people who challenge us on the information we've presented about alcohol's effects. They often base their argument on a study in the British Journal of Dermatology (July 2007, pages 74–81) that concluded "alcohol-based hand rubs cause less irritation than hand washing…." But, the only thing this study showed was that alcohol was not as irritating as an even more irritating hand wash, which contained sodium lauryl sulfate. So, the study is actually just telling you that one irritant, sodium lauryl sulfate, is worse than another irritant, alcohol.

Not all alcohols are bad. For example, there are fatty alcohols, which are absolutely non-irritating and can be beneficial for skin. Examples that you'll see on ingredient labels include cetyl alcohol, stearyl alcohol, and cetearyl alcohol, all of which are good ingredients for skin. It's important to differentiate between these skin-friendly alcohols and the problematic alcohols.

References for this information:

Chemical Immunology and Allergy, March 2012, pages 77–80

Aging, March 2012, pages 166–175

Journal of Occupational Medicine and Toxicology, November 2008, pages 1–16

Dermato-Endocrinology, January 2011, pages 41–49

Experimental Dermatology, June 2008, pages 542–551

Clinical Dermatology, September-October 2004, pages 360–366

Alcohol Journal, April 2002, pages 179–190

Jar Packaging: No
Tested on animals: Yes
Inspired by the regions where people live longer: the Blue Zones, Chanel Research sourced three longevity ingredients from the diet of the Blue Zone populations for the first time in a breakthrough skincare. GREEN COFFEE FROM NICOYA, COSTA RICA: Heightened antioxidant properties help shield the complexion. Following a specific Polyfractioning extraction process, the resulting Green Coffee PFA contains 70 times more antioxidant active molecules than are found in regular coffee beans. BOSANA OLIVES FROM SARDINIA, ITALY: Essential fatty acids and higher-level skin-fortifying polyphenols help protect skin. The patented Oleo-Eco-Extraction process delivers their most powerful properties. LENTISK FROM IKARIA, GREECE: Naturally occurring Oleanolic Acid helps reinforce skins natural restorative abilities. Purified through CO2 Supercritical Extraction, these molecules ensure optimal protection for skin.
Aqua (Water), Alcohol, Glycerin, Dimethicone/Vinyl Dimethicone Crosspolymer, Niacinamide, Olea Europaea (Olive) Fruit Oil, Secale Cereale (Rye) Seed Extract, Olea Europaea (Olive) Leaf Extract, Coffea Arabica (Coffee) Seed Oil, Pistacia Lentiscus (Mastic) Gum, PEG-60 Hydrogenated Castor Oil, Acrylates/Vinyl Isodecanoate Crosspolymer, Pentylene Glycol, C12-14 Pareth-12, Ethylhexyl Palmitate, Lysolecithin, Phenoxyethanol, Sodium Citrate, Caprylic/Capric Triglyceride, Parfum (Fragrance), Sodium Carbomer, Disodium EDTA, Polyquanternium-51, Propylene Glycol, Adenosine, Biosaccharide Gum-1, Chlorphenesin, Alcaligenes Polysaccharides, Sodium Hyaluronate, Tocopherol.

Chanel At-A-Glance

Strengths: Sleek and occasionally elegant packaging; the sunscreens provide broad-spectrum protection; a handful of good cleansers and a topical scrub; some impressive foundations with sunscreen; an assortment of good makeup products including concealer, blush, mascara, eyeshadow and bronzer.

Weaknesses: Expensive, with an emphasis on style over substance; overpriced; overreliance on jar packaging; antioxidants in most products amount to a mere dusting; no products to successfully address sun- or hormone-induced skin discolorations with research-proven ingredients; mostly mediocre to poor eye pencils; extremely limited options for eyeshadows if you want a matte finish.

The history of this Paris-bred line is steeped in fashion, jewelry, and fragrance firsts. The image-is-everything fashion sensibility and fragrance know-how have been loosely translated to Chanels ever-imposing skin-care collection, now divided into several categories, although most of them have overlapping, overly exaggerated claims and over-the-top pricing. The company likes to mention its research facility, referred to as C.E.R.I.E.S. (Centre de Recherches et d'Investigations Epidermiques et Sensorielles) as a way to give credibility to its products and the formulary expertise of Chanel's team of scientists, but its studies are not necessarily the kind of independent research that shows up in medical journals.

Founded in 1991 and funded by Chanel, the goal of this research facility is "to help provide a scientific foundation for the design of skin care products and to promote public awareness of the principles underlying maintenance of healthy, attractive skin." Examining Chanel's often lengthy ingredient lists reveals that they believe healthy, attractive skin requires mostly standard, banal ingredients coupled with lots of fragrance and just a smattering of anything resembling state-of-the-art ingredients. Designing skin-care products whose purpose is to reinforce healthy skin doesn't involve strong scents, irritants such as alcohol, or sunscreens whose SPF ratings fall below the standards set by major health organizations, including the American Academy of Dermatology and corresponding international academies as well. Furthermore, their N 1 products claim to increase skin's oxygen uptake, something that essentially puts skin on the fast track for more free-radical damage, and no one at C.E.R.I.E.S. seems to have any idea about how to treat acne-prone skin. (Well, let's face it, acne is never fashionable.)

Just like most Chanel skin-care products, the research facility and its ties to the dermatology community make it sound more impressive than it really is. Chanel's influence on fashion and luxury accoutrements is legendary and ongoing; but their skin-care products simply cannot compete with what many other lines are doing, including Estee Lauder, Clinique, Prescriptives, Olay, Dove, Neutrogena, and many others. Considering the couture-level prices, too much of Chanel's skin care is average, and that doesn't look good on anyone.

For more information about Chanel, call (800) 550-0005 or visit www.chanel.com.

Chanel Makeup

Chanel pulls out all the stops to present their makeup in the most flattering light. Many of their products are deserving of the best status, but, frustratingly, an equal number disappoint, seeming to coast on Chanel's name and attention to upscale, designer-influenced packaging rather than providing true quality. For example, few companies have foundations with textures as varied and state-of-the-art as Chanel. However, most of their foundations with sunscreen are formulated without essential UVA-protecting ingredients, even though Chanel clearly knows about this issue, as evidenced from their numerous skin-care products that do contain avobenzone or titanium dioxide. Neglecting adequate UVA protection while going on about how the product creates younger-looking skin is not only inaccurate, it's harmful to your skin's health and appearance.

Beyond inadequate sunscreen, Chanel's eye and lip pencils have extraordinary prices, but ordinary to poor performance, and most of their "we're trying to be unique and clever" products don't do much to prove they're worthy of purchase. It's hard to ignore that much of what Chanel does well other lines do just as well (and sometimes better), and with a more realistic price range to boot. However, the overall situation is better than standard but well-dressed formulas with shamelessly affluent prices, because although it's not inexpensive, the best of Chanel's makeup is truly outstanding. What's needed to establish consistency is an overhaul of the many products that have fallen behind formula-wise. We doubt Chanel will reevaluate their pricing for the better, but given that, the least you should expect is stellar performance from everything you buy that bears the iconic double C logo!

Note: Chanel is categorized as a brand that tests on animals because its products are sold in China. Although Chanel does not conduct animal testing for its products sold elsewhere, the Chinese government requires imported cosmetics be tested on animals, so foreign companies retailing there must comply. This requirement is why some brands state that they dont test on animals unless required by law. Animal rights organizations consider cosmetic companies retailed in China to be brands that test on animals, and so does the Beautypedia Research Team.

About the Experts

The Beautypedia team consists of skin care and makeup experts personally trained by the original Cosmetics Cop and best-selling beauty author, Paula Begoun. We’re fascinated by skin care and makeup products and thrilled when they meet or exceed our expectations, but we’re also disappointed when they fail to perform as claimed, are wildly overpriced, or contain ingredients scientific research has proven can hurt skin.

Our mission has always been to help you find the best products for your skin, no matter your budget or preferences. Beautypedia’s thorough and insightful reviews cut through the hype and provide reliable recommendations for all ages, skin types, and skin tones.