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Aesop

Bitter Orange Astringent Toner

3.40 fl. oz. for $ 33.00
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This alcohol-based toner is little more than perfume for the skin—an irritation waiting to happen. Irritation, whether you see it on the surface of your skin or not, causes inflammation, and as a result impairs healing, damages collagen, and depletes the vital substances your skin needs to stay young. See More Info for details on why daily use of highly fragrant products is such a problem, and for details on what alcohol does to skin.

As if including alcohol as the second listed ingredient weren't bad enough, this also contains witch hazel water, which itself has a high alcohol content (most forms of witch hazel are 14–15% alcohol) due to the distillation process used to extract it from the plant. Joining the irritation from the alcohol and witch hazel are fragrant oils that have no established benefit for skin. Instead, they add up to a potent dose of skin-irritating fragrance.

Skip the Bitter Orange Astringent Toner and look to the superior formulas we recommend on our list of GOOD to BEST Toners. A well-formulated, gentle toner can be a wonderfully soothing product for the skin, but this is not it.

Pros:
  • None.
Cons:
  • The alcohol-based formula puts skin at risk of considerable irritation, dryness, and other issues.
  • Expensive for what's essentially perfume for the skin.
  • The many fragrant plant oils add further irritation.
More Info:

Daily use of products that contain a high amount of fragrance, whether the fragrant ingredients are synthetic or natural, causes chronic irritation that can damage healthy collagen production, lead to or worsen dryness, and impair your skin's ability to heal. Fragrance-free is the best way to go for all skin types. If fragrance in your skin-care products is important to you, it should be a very low amount to minimize the risk to your skin (Sources: Inflammation Research, December 2008, pages 558–563; Skin Pharmacology and Physiology, June 2008, pages 124–135, and November-December 2000, pages 358–371; Journal of Investigative Dermatology, April 2008, pages 15–19; Journal of Cosmetic Dermatology, March 2008, pages 78–82; Mechanisms of Ageing and Development, January 2007, pages 92–105; and British Journal of Dermatology, December 2005, pages S13–S22).

Alcohol in Skin Care: There is a significant amount of research showing alcohol causes free-radical damage in skin even at low levels. Small amounts of alcohol on skin cells in lab settings (about 3%, but keep in mind skin-care products contain amounts ranging from 5% to 60% or greater) over the course of two days increased cell death by 26%. It also destroyed the substances in cells that reduce inflammation and defend against free radicals—this process actually causes more free-radical damage. If this weren't bad enough, exposure to alcohol causes skin cells to self-destruct. The research also showed that these destructive, aging effects on skin cells increased the longer their exposure to alcohol; for example, two days of exposure was dramatically more harmful than one day, and that's at only a 3% concentration (Sources: Journal of Investigative Dermatology, August 2009, pages 20–24; "Skin Care—From the Inside Out and Outside In," Tufts Daily, April 1, 2002; Alcohol, Volume 26, Issue 3, April 2002, pages 179–190; eMedicine Journal, May 8, 2002, volume 3, number 5, www.emedicine.com; Critical Reviews in Clinical Laboratory Sciences, April 2001, pages 109–166; Cutis, February 2001, pages 25–27; Contact Dermatitis, January 1996, pages 12–16; and http://pubs.niaaa.nih.gov/publications/arh27-4/277-284.htm).

For more on alcohol's (as in, ethanol, denatured alcohol, and ethyl alcohol) effects on skin, see our article on the topic: Alcohol in Skin Care: The Facts.

Jar Packaging: No
Tested on animals: No

This gentle yet astringent citrus-based formulation thoroughly cleanses the skin of sweat and grime, to leave it balanced, refreshed and prepared for hydration.

Water (Aqua), Alcohol Denat., Hamamelis Virginiana (Witch Hazel) Water, Polysorbate 80, Glycerin, Camellia Sinensis Leaf Extract, Phenoxyethanol, Lavandula Angustifolia (Lavender) Oil, Citrus Aurantium Amara (Bitter Orange) Oil, Rosmarinus Officinalis (Rosemary) Leaf Oil, Disodium EDTA, Hamamelis Virginiana (Witch Hazel) Extract, Achillea Millefolium Oil, Eucalyptus Globulus Leaf Oil, Laurus Nobilis Oil, Salvia Officinalis (Sage) Oil, d-Limonene, Linalool.

Strengths: Some products are packaged to keep their light- and air-sensitive ingredients stable.

Weaknesses:Multiple fragrant ingredients are present in each product reviewed, and this poses a strong risk of irritation; no effective options for treating concerns like acne, brown spots, or rosacea; jar packaging for some of the moisturizers wont keep the beneficial ingredients stable; overpriced.

Australian brand Aesop bears the same name as the famous Greek storyteller, and their skin-care products certainly emulate the art of storytelling with their formulas and marketing. The question is whether or not you can believe Aesop and their natural-themed skin-care stories, or if its mostly fable.

From Aesops stripped-down, utilitarian packaging, earthy product descriptions, and overall design aesthetic, its easy to see why those interested in natural-oriented products are attracted to the Aesop brand. How could skin-care products that seem to be so pure and natural be bad, right? We certainly understand the emotional pull natural products have on many people, but the truth is there are good and bad natural ingredients (snake venom and poison ivy are both natural ingredients, but you wouldnt want them on your face), just as there are good and bad synthetic ingredients. Going natural without knowing the details of what youre buying is a recipe for skin problems, not a guarantee of better products.

Refreshingly, compared to many natural-themed lines, Aesop doesnt rely on scare tactics or outlandish claims. Therefore, you wont read anything about toxins or about made-up claims that all chemicals are bad (because everything is composed of chemicals). Instead, Aesop prefers to rest on the quality of their formulas and oeuvre to do the real selling. Judging by the number of requests weve had to review this brand, their less sensationalized approach is working!

With that promising start, its disappointing that Aesop chose to include such a generous amount of fragrance and plant-based irritants in many of their products. In fact, there wasnt a single fragrance-free option in any of the products that we reviewed. (In fact, the box they were shipped in was saturated with fragrance just from the shipping process.) There were a few products with lower amounts of added fragrancethese instances are noted (where applicable)but there usually were other compelling reasons to avoid any given product in this brand, or at least to consider it cautiously.

Also noteworthy: You will find that much of Aesops line, from their cleansers, toners, and moisturizers to their masks and eye treatments, have high-end price tags. While we tend to leave it up to the reader to determine what is or isnt expensive, there were a few instances where the formulas were so basic that we had to mention the disconnect with the costthese were truly simple blends of ingredients that in no way justified their cost.

All of the above is a prelude to the most critical downfall of the Aesop products: There are no options that can successfully (and without potential irritation) address the needs of various skin types or skin concerns of many people. Whether youre struggling with acne, wrinkles, both, or numerous other concerns, from sensitive skin to conditions like rosacea or eczema, you wont find brilliant products to treat them here. Overall, that means assembling a great skin-care routine with Aesop products just isnt possible.

Aesop is sold primarily in department stores like Barneys New York, online, as well as freestanding Aesop stores throughout the United States. Despite their growing distribution, we cannot stress enough how much this lines products disappoint. Aesop has natural ingredients aplentybut what good is that when so many of the natural ingredients they chose are of little to no benefit for skin, or are potentially problematic?

For more information about Aesop, visit http://www.aesop.com/usa/

About the Experts

The Beautypedia team consists of skin care and makeup experts personally trained by the original Cosmetics Cop and best-selling beauty author, Paula Begoun. We’re fascinated by skin care and makeup products and thrilled when they meet or exceed our expectations, but we’re also disappointed when they fail to perform as claimed, are wildly overpriced, or contain ingredients scientific research has proven can hurt skin.

Our mission has always been to help you find the best products for your skin, no matter your budget or preferences. Beautypedia’s thorough and insightful reviews cut through the hype and provide reliable recommendations for all ages, skin types, and skin tones.

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