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Moon Juice

Beauty Shroom Exfoliating Acid Potion

3.30 fl. oz. for $ 39.00
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There’s much to be excited about with Moon Juice’s Beauty Shroom Exfoliating Acid Potion, but the inclusion of one fragrant oil tempers our excitement and keeps us from being able to recommend this leave-on exfoliant.

Nicely packaged in a brown glass bottle with a black cap and plastic dispenser to control how much of this liquid comes out per use, Shroom Exfoliating Acid Potion would work well for all skin types if not for the clary oil it contains. This oil’s chief fragrant components are variable amounts of linalool and linalyl acetate, both known skin irritants that become more potent when exposed to air (inevitable from use of such products). Note that the oil form of clary is different from clary extract, which isn’t considered sensitizing.

What a shame, as this otherwise has the makings of a great AHA/BHA exfoliant. The AHA glycolic acid leads the list, although Moon Juice does not reveal its percentage or the amounts of lactic and salicylic acid in the formula. That’s disappointing given this information is a necessary part of choosing a leave-on exfoliant; however, we suspect the combined amount of AHA and BHA is between 10-12%, and the pH of 3.7 allows them to work as exfoliants. AHAs exfoliate in concentrations of 5% or greater, so you’re covered.

More positives come from the inclusion of niacinamide, some very good antioxidants, soothing plant extracts, and hydrating propanediol. Combined with the exfoliating ingredients, skin is left refined, smooth, hydrated and glowing—how we wish clary oil hadn’t brought this party to a halt.

See our list of best AHA and best BHA exfoliants for effective alternatives that omit fragrant irritants.

Pros:
  • Appears to contain efficacious amounts of AHA glycolic acid and BHA salicylic acid.
  • Formulated in the correct pH range for exfoliation to occur.
  • Contains niacinamide and some soothing plant ingredients.
  • Packaged to keep the light- and air-sensitive ingredients stable.
  • Leaves skin smooth, refined and hydrated.
Cons:
  • The brand does not reveal the total percentage of acids.
  • Fragrance chemicals in clary oil pose a strong risk of irritating skin.

References for information on clary oil:
Toxicological Sciences, January 2018, pages 139-148
Apoptosis, February 2017, pages 175-187
Plant Biology, July 2008, pages 433-440
Cell Proliferation, June 2004, pages 221-229

Jar Packaging: No
Tested on animals: No

This Exfoliating Acid Potion is like skin magic — a quickie facial that resurfaces and restores to reveal tighter, brighter, smoother skin. Our potent AHA and BHA 5-acid complex features Glycolic, Lactic, and Salicylic Acid to help encourage natural cellular turnover, unclog and minimize the appearance of pores, and visibly reduce the appearance of fine lines and wrinkles. Vitamin B3 pairs with adaptogenic Reishi and Tocotrienols to help boost hydration, combat the signs of oxidative stress, and fortify the skin's natural barrier.

Water, Glycolic Acid, Phytic Acid, Sodium Hydroxide, Niacinamide, Propanediol, Glycereth-7 Trimethyl Ether, Lactic Acid, Salicylic Acid, Allantoin, Ganoderma Lucidum (Reishi Mushroom) Extract, Tocotrienols, Glycerin, Polyglyceryl-10 Oleate, Oryza Sativa (Rice) Bran Oil, Tocopherol, Salvia Sclarea (Clary) Oil, Citric Acid, Lonicera Caprifolium (Honeysuckle) Flower Extract, Lonicera Japonica (Honeysuckle) Flower Extract.

Moon Juice is the brainchild of Amanda Chantal Bacon, a California-based chef who sought to create her own holistic brand after changing her diet to treat hyperthyroidism. A chef creating a skin care line might seem an odd segue, but it makes sense given Moon Juice also sells plenty of oral supplements, too.

The products from Moon Juice focus on “raw, medical foods”, a topic that covers a lot of ground. Bacon refers to these ingredients as “adaptogens,” claiming they help your body better handle mental, physical, and emotional stress. There’s some research supporting this, mostly in terms of antioxidant and anti-inflammatory benefits, but Moon Juice is hardly the only company whose products tout such benefits.

Moon Juice offers everything from pressed juices and cocoa powder to probiotics and dried fruit. The brand also recently started selling a small number of skin care products based on Bacon’s views on the best ways to approach all-over health.

Our take on Moon Juice is that the line has some good ideas but doesn’t quite hit the mark when it comes to what research says is good for skin. Antioxidants are included (many of them tied in to mushrooms and other “raw” foods), and the brand’s leave-on exfoliant contains both AHAs and BHA at a pH that’s optimal for them to be effective.

The issue, though, is that Moon Juice’s holistic philosophy also means emphasis is put on “natural” essential oils. Though essential oils smell nice, and research has shown that smell can improve a person’s mood, but these oils do not do skin any favors; they can cause irritation. In skin care, what’s best for skin’s health should be paramount. You can achieve the mind-body connection via aroma with options that don’t have to touch your skin; for example, an essential oil diffuser or scented candle.

To learn more about Moon Juice, visit https://moonjuice.com/.

About the Experts

The Beautypedia team consists of skin care and makeup experts personally trained by the original Cosmetics Cop and best-selling beauty author, Paula Begoun. We’re fascinated by skin care and makeup products and thrilled when they meet or exceed our expectations, but we’re also disappointed when they fail to perform as claimed, are wildly overpriced, or contain ingredients scientific research has proven can hurt skin.

Our mission has always been to help you find the best products for your skin, no matter your budget or preferences. Beautypedia’s thorough and insightful reviews cut through the hype and provide reliable recommendations for all ages, skin types, and skin tones.