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Urban Decay

B6 Vitamin-Infused Complexion Prep Priming Spray

4.00 fl. oz. for $ 31.00
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Ingredients

Brand Overview

Urban Decay makes its B6 Vitamin-Infused Complexion Prep Priming Spray sound like it's chockfull of good-for-skin ingredients, but its bad ingredients outweigh any benefit they might have for skin.

The brand talks up the vitamins this contains, and while two forms of vitamin E and pro-vitamin B5 (panthenol) are present, the vitamin B6 (pyridoxine) that's heavily touted doesn't have a wealth of research proving its benefits for skin.

Even if it did, this formula contains a high amount of drying, skin damaging alcohol (it's the second ingredient listed), which can lead to an increase in breakouts and oil production, as well as disrupt the skin's protective barrier. See More Info for the research-supported facts on alcohol.

It also includes menthyl ethylamido oxalate, a more potent form of menthol which can irritate skin. (See More Info for details.) As if that wasn't enough, fragrance is also in the mix, which is another source of potential skin irritation. Not what you want from a product that is supposed to reduce oiliness and soothe skin!

For primers that can help reduce skin and are truly soothing, see our list of Best Foundation Primers.

Pros:
  • None.
Cons:
  • Contains a high amount of skin damaging alcohol.
  • Not nourishing or revolutionary as claimed.
  • Potent form of menthol can irritate skin.
  • Fragrant formula can promote further irritation.
More Info:

Alcohol-Based Skincare Products: Research makes it clear that alcohol, as a main ingredient in any skincare product, especially one you use frequently and repeatedly, is a problem.

When we express concern about the presence of alcohol in skincare or makeup products, we're referring to denatured ethanol, which most often is listed as SD alcohol, alcohol denat., denatured alcohol, or (less often) isopropyl alcohol.

When you see these types of alcohol listed among the first six ingredients on an ingredient label, without question the product will irritate and cause other problems for skin. There's no way around it—these volatile alcohols are simply bad for all skin types.

The reason they're included in products is because they provide a quick-drying finish, immediately degrease skin, and feel weightless, so it's easy to see their appeal, especially for those with oily skin. If only those short-term benefits didn't lead to negative long-term outcomes!

Using products that contain these alcohols will cause dryness, erosion of skin's protective barrier, and a strain on how skin replenishes, renews, and rejuvenates itself. Alcohol just weakens everything about skin.

The irony of using alcohol-based products to control oily skin is that the damage from the alcohol can actually lead to an increase in breakouts and enlarged pores. As we said, the alcohol does have an immediate de-greasing effect on skin, but it causes irritation, which eventually will counteract the de-greasing effect and make your oily skin look even more shiny.

There are people who challenge us on the information we've presented about alcohol's effects. They often base their argument on a study in the British Journal of Dermatology (July 2007, pages 74–81) that concluded "alcohol-based hand rubs cause less irritation than hand washing…." But, the only thing this study showed was that alcohol was not as irritating as an even more irritating hand wash, which contained sodium lauryl sulfate. So, the study is actually just telling you that one irritant, sodium lauryl sulfate, is worse than another irritant, alcohol.

Not all alcohols are bad. For example, there are fatty alcohols, which are absolutely non-irritating and can be beneficial for skin. Examples that you'll see on ingredient labels include cetyl alcohol, stearyl alcohol, and cetearyl alcohol, all of which are good ingredients for skin. It's important to differentiate between these skin-friendly alcohols and the problematic alcohols.

References for this information:

Chemical Immunology and Allergy, March 2012, pages 77–80

Aging, March 2012, pages 166–175

Journal of Occupational Medicine and Toxicology, November 2008, pages 1–16

Dermato-Endocrinology, January 2011, pages 41–49

Experimental Dermatology, June 2008, pages 542–551

Clinical Dermatology, September-October 2004, pages 360–366

Alcohol Journal, April 2002, pages 179–190

Irritating Ingredients: We cannot stress this enough: Sensitizing, harsh, abrasive, and/or fragrant ingredients are bad for all skin types. Daily application of skincare products that contain these irritating ingredients is a major way we unwittingly do our skin a disservice!

Irritating ingredients are a problem because they can lead to visible problems, such as redness, rough skin, dull skin, dryness, increased oil production, and clogged pores, and they contribute to making signs of aging worse.

Switching to non-irritating, gentle skincare products can make all the difference in the world. Non-irritating products are those packed with beneficial ingredients that also replenish and soothe skin, without any volatile ingredients, such as those present in fragrance ingredients, whether natural or synthetic.

A surprising fact: Research has demonstrated that you do not need to see or feel the effects of irritants on your skin for your skin to be suffering, and visible damage may not become apparent for a long time. Don't get lulled into thinking that if you don't see or feel signs of irritation, everything is OK.

Generally, it's best to eliminate, or minimize as much as possible, your exposure to ingredients that are known to irritate skin. There are many completely non-irritating products that contain effective ingredients, so there's no reason to put your skin at risk with products that include ingredients research has shown can be a problem.

References for this information:

Journal of Dermatological Sciences, January 2015, pages 28–36

International Journal of Cosmetic Science, August 2014, pages 379–385

Clinical Dermatology, May-June 2012, pages 257–262

Aging, March 2012, pages 166–175

Chemical Immunology and Allergy, March 2012, pages 77–80

Skin Pharmacology and Physiology, June 2008, pages 124–135

Food and Chemical Toxicology, February 2008, pages 446–475

American Journal of Clinical Dermatology, 2003, pages 789–798

Jar Packaging: No
Tested on animals: No

Want to give your skin a quick hit of vitamins and calm a multitude of sins? This soothing spray preps, primes and balances the complexion while evening out skin tone, absorbing oil and reducing shine. Spritz B6 Prep Priming Spray on any time of day to hydrate, prep and soften your skin with vitamins and antioxidants. Use it in the morning to prep and wake up your skin, during the day to refresh your skin (without messing up your makeup), or at night before your treatment. Versatile enough for people of all ages and skin types, this energizing formula is great for your skin AND feels amazing. Theres no such thing as too much! (And B6 is so good for your skin that youll want to use it ALL day long.) Our formula (created in an exclusive partnership with Skindinavia) is so scientifically advanced, it contains the FIRST patented, stabilized form of topical vitamin B6. We loaded this spray with skin-nourishing ingredients. In addition to stabilized vitamin B6, this high-tech formula contains antioxidant vitamin E and exfoliating willow bark.

Aqua / Water, Alcohol Denat., Hydrolyzed Corn Starch, Phenoxyethanol, Propanediol, Xylityl Phosphate, Polyhydroxystearic Acid, Salix Nigra Bark Extract / Willow Bark Extract, Menthyl Ethylamido Oxalate, Glycereth-5 Lactate, Xylitol, Isononyl Isononanoate, Ethylhexyl Isononanoate, Sodium Cocamidopropyl PG-Dimonium Chloride Phosphate, Silica, Pyridoxine Cyclic Phosphate, Panthenol, Sodium Hydroxide, Ethylhexylglycerin, Tocopheryl Acetate, Hydrolyzed Soy Protein, Fructan, Phenylpropanol, Methyl Diisopropyl Propionamide, Caprylyl Glycol, Parfum / Fragrance, Butylene Glycol, Coconut Acid, Aloe Barbadensis Leaf Juice Powder, Maltodextrin, Tocopherol, Potassium Sorbate, Sodium Benzoate.

Urban Decay At-A-Glance

Strengths: Workable options in almost every category; excellent cheek tint; bonanza for anyone who wants lots of shiny eyeshadows; good mattifier;bronzing powder; brow products; makeup brushes.

Weaknesses: Mostly average to poor mascaras; limited foundation shades and some disappointing lip glosses; the products designed to help makeup last longer don't help.

From its unconventional beginnings in 1996 with the debut tagline of "Does Pink Make You Puke?" Urban Decay has been at the forefront of the ongoing trend toward unconventional colors. Their approach to beauty is still rooted in steering clear of the norm, but for those creative, unconventional folks who want the opportunity to express themselves with well-formulated, edgy products, this is the line to look to.

Now representing itself by the decidedly tamer "Beauty with an Edge" slogan, the line still offers several shiny options (which excel by virtue of how well they cling to skin), but the items that really deserve your attention include some of their mascaras, bronzing powder, blush, and brow products. The brush collection is highly recommended and priced on the low end when compared to other department-store lines, and Urban Decay counters (as opposed to Sephora stores, where the line is typically sold) offer helpful literature about how to design a complete makeup look. The colors may be unconventional and more clownish than classy, but their placement advice is right-on.

Shortcomings of this edgy line include the lack of lipsticks and some glittery products that apply terribly. Those who appreciate products that make a statement (though it may not always be one that puts you in your most flattering light) should explore the best of what is offered here, as should those whose makeup concepts occasionally lean toward the adventurous side.

For more information about Urban Decay, call (800) 784-URBAN or visit www.urbandecay.com.

About the Experts

The Beautypedia team consists of skin care and makeup experts personally trained by the original Cosmetics Cop and best-selling beauty author, Paula Begoun. We’re fascinated by skin care and makeup products and thrilled when they meet or exceed our expectations, but we’re also disappointed when they fail to perform as claimed, are wildly overpriced, or contain ingredients scientific research has proven can hurt skin.

Our mission has always been to help you find the best products for your skin, no matter your budget or preferences. Beautypedia’s thorough and insightful reviews cut through the hype and provide reliable recommendations for all ages, skin types, and skin tones.