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Peter Thomas Roth

8% Glycolic Solutions Toner

5.00 fl. oz. for $ 40.00
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We wish Peter Thomas Roth's fragrance-free 8% Glycolic Solutions Toner didn't contain two problematic ingredients known to irritate skin because without them, this would be a top-rated AHA exfoliant for all skin types.

Housed in a dark blue bottle topped with a pump dispenser, the water-based toner contains 8% glycolic acid and has a pH of 3.8, which ensures exfoliation will occur. Its fluid texture feels super light and isn't the least bit sticky or tacky. Skin is left feeling lightly hydrated and smooth, and other products layer beautifully on top.

Another accolade? Roth includes soothing, antioxidant plant extracts to help offset the potential irritation from the amount of AHA. This approach is a great way to ensure skin gets the maximum benefits of an AHA exfoliant without tipping the scales toward trouble.

The alcohol is present in an iffy amount (see More Info for details) making this exfoliant harder to recommend. On the one hand, the total amount of alcohol likely poses a low risk of irritating skin. On the other hand, there are alcohol-free AHA exfoliants that don't present this risk—those are the options we suggest checking out first.

Pros:
  • Delivers 8% glycolic acid in a pH-correct formula that really will exfoliate.
  • Super-light liquid leaves a smooth, lightly hydrated, non-sticky finish.
  • Pump-top dispenser makes this easy to use via fingers or cotton pad.
  • Contains soothing plant extracts.
Cons:
  • Alcohol and witch hazel pose a risk of irritating skin.
More Info:

Alcohol-Based Skincare Products: Research makes it clear that alcohol, as a main ingredient in any skincare product, especially one you use frequently and repeatedly, is a problem.

When we express concern about the presence of alcohol in skincare or makeup products, we're referring to denatured ethanol, which most often is listed as SD alcohol, alcohol denat., denatured alcohol, or (less often) isopropyl alcohol.

When you see these types of alcohol listed among the first six ingredients on an ingredient label, without question the product will irritate and cause other problems for skin. There's no way around it—these volatile alcohols are simply bad for all skin types.

The reason they're included in products is because they provide a quick-drying finish, immediately degrease skin, and feel weightless, so it's easy to see their appeal, especially for those with oily skin. If only those short-term benefits didn't lead to negative long-term outcomes!

Using products that contain these alcohols will cause dryness, erosion of skin's protective barrier, and a strain on how skin replenishes, renews, and rejuvenates itself. Alcohol just weakens everything about skin.

The irony of using alcohol-based products to control oily skin is that the damage from the alcohol can actually lead to an increase in breakouts and enlarged pores. As we said, the alcohol does have an immediate de-greasing effect on skin, but it causes irritation, which eventually will counteract the de-greasing effect and make your oily skin look even more shiny.

There are people who challenge us on the information we've presented about alcohol's effects. They often base their argument on a study in the British Journal of Dermatology (July 2007, pages 74–81) that concluded "alcohol-based hand rubs cause less irritation than hand washing…." But, the only thing this study showed was that alcohol was not as irritating as an even more irritating hand wash, which contained sodium lauryl sulfate. So, the study is actually just telling you that one irritant, sodium lauryl sulfate, is worse than another irritant, alcohol.

Not all alcohols are bad. For example, there are fatty alcohols, which are absolutely non-irritating and can be beneficial for skin. Examples that you'll see on ingredient labels include cetyl alcohol, stearyl alcohol, and cetearyl alcohol, all of which are good ingredients for skin. It's important to differentiate between these skin-friendly alcohols and the problematic alcohols.

References for this information:

Chemical Immunology and Allergy, March 2012, pages 77–80

Aging, March 2012, pages 166–175

Journal of Occupational Medicine and Toxicology, November 2008, pages 1–16

Dermato-Endocrinology, January 2011, pages 41–49

Experimental Dermatology, June 2008, pages 542–551

Clinical Dermatology, September-October 2004, pages 360–366

Alcohol Journal, April 2002, pages 179–190

Jar Packaging: No
Tested on animals: Yes
This toning complex with Glycolic Acid at 8% and Witch Hazel chemically exfoliates the skins surface to help reduce the appearance of fine lines, wrinkles, pores and uneven skin tone while helping to brighten, clarify and smooth out the look of skin. Witch Hazel helps effectively remove excess oil, dirt and impurities. Allantoin, Chamomile and Aloe Vera help soothe and calm the look of skin while Sodium PCA leaves skin lightly hydrated.
Water, Glycolic Acid, Alcohol Denat., Methyl Gluceth-20, Propylene Glycol, Hamamelis Virginiana (Witch Hazel) Water, Sodium Hydroxide, Glycerin, Sodium PCA, Aloe Barbadensis Leaf Juice, Allantoin, Camellia Sinensis Leaf Extract, Chamomilla Recutita (Matricaria) Flower Extract, Arginine, Sodium Ascorbyl Phosphate, Lactic Acid, Citric Acid, Polysorbate 20, Butylene Glycol, Potassium Sorbate, Sodium Benzoate, Benzoic Acid, Phenoxyethanol.

Peter Thomas Roth At-A-Glance

Peter Thomas Roth is a large but straightforward line with mostly uncomplicated formulations that, for the most part, are quite good and state-of-the-art. Unlike many product lines, most of the acne, AHA, BHA, sunscreen, and moisturizing products contain what they should to be effective and helpful for skin.

Even more impressive are the well-formulated cleansers, sunscreens, AHA products, and skin lighteners. The moisturizers have improved somewhat, and most are now packaged so that the light- and air-sensitive ingredients remain stable. In fact, Roth's packaging deserves special mention because it is exceptionally utilitarian.

After all that glowing praise, what you should be aware of are the instances of products containing potential irritants (noted in their respective reviews) as well as the products in jar packaging that contain ingredients which are sensitive to air and light.

For more information about Peter Thomas Roth, call (800) PTR-SKIN or visit www.peterthomasroth.com.

About the Experts

The Beautypedia team consists of skin care and makeup experts personally trained by the original Cosmetics Cop and best-selling beauty author, Paula Begoun. We’re fascinated by skin care and makeup products and thrilled when they meet or exceed our expectations, but we’re also disappointed when they fail to perform as claimed, are wildly overpriced, or contain ingredients scientific research has proven can hurt skin.

Our mission has always been to help you find the best products for your skin, no matter your budget or preferences. Beautypedia’s thorough and insightful reviews cut through the hype and provide reliable recommendations for all ages, skin types, and skin tones.